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Beyond Comprehension

KillerFord1977

Ronin
Founding Member
i don't care the laws in some states, but getting a "provisional" license at 15 is still too young for me.

it should be at the very least 16. better still at 18.

my guess is at the time of night, the kid fell asleep at the wheel. heck, as a long time trucker, i know the effects of driving from the hours of 2AM till 5AM. if i recall, those are the hours of our deepest REM sleep.

since the kid and his passenger are dead, nothing can be done to them personally, but if the pick up truck owner had any insurance, then i hope the families sue the crap outta it.

13 WAS according to the article, breaking the law.
Article states the tire failed.
 

KillerFord1977

Ronin
Founding Member
I taught my kids to drive at 12. On the property. So If I had a medical emergency, they could drive me, or themselves back to the camp, neighbors farm, etc to get help.

Doesnt mean they should regualry drive on the roadway. Just a life lesson.

Rural folks usually do things that city folk may not find “in the normal” as assistance may not be prevalent.

Horrendous Tragedy in this accident, but maybe the 13 yr old was driving due to an emergency situation ??

Not legal by any means, but we dont know all the facts .
 

Susquash

Master Class
Founding Member
Granddaughter in AK just turned 14 and got her learner's permit. Told her she is going to have to learn to slow down as she drives 4 wheelers and golf carts "pedal to the metal". At least her parents are doing it right and teaching her to drive. a stick.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
So Kyle Rittenhouse should’ve been found guilty, right?
Why the hell would you bring that into this discussion ? It’s not even relevant since according to the law, he didn’t break any laws and driving is not a constitutionality protected right.

I agree with you about the driving part, but the only purpose that comment serves is to affirm your opinion on the Rittenhouse thing, which we all knew already and which has nothing to do with the topic at hand.

So let’s do this. You seem to be saying that the legal right to drive on public roads should be based on skill, not age. I agree with this by the way. That said, why not apply the same logic to carrying a concealed handgun ?
 

Brawny

Operator
you would not be the first to say this. in fact, i used to watch that Dr. Pol animal vet tv show. there was a young gal, maybe about 16, driving i think a huge Ford F-350, pulling a LARGE horse trailer to his office..!!

dang if i wasn't impressed (as a former truck driver myself) with her skills...

but to me, that is

#1...the rare exception

#2 ..primarily on farm/back roads, not the super slabs.

#3.. as an average (or whole), no one under 16 (18 best) should be, behind the wheel.

i'm even dead-set against what some in the trucking industry want to do...open the driving of 18 wheelers to 18 year olds....all because of a so-called trucker shortage.

well, for that matter, the country is short police, firemen, doctors, lawyers, teachers, plumbers, electricians, airplane pilots, ...etc.

are we to open the flood gates for those trades/responsible jobs to 18 year olds too..????
I think that most young farmers who drive farm vehicles have a level of work ethic and responsibility that reduces the risk of bad outcomes on the road. In terms of the shortages in other areas you mention, I think using age as the sole benchmark of responsibility is not correct....it's just the easiest (and sometimes arbitrary) measure of suitability for responsibility in our culture. It's easy to check off a box of "18 or older" or "21 and older" than to see if that person really is suited for the responsibility.

I was 18 when I was accepted into the police department as a recruit (I decided to take a different career path though).
I had friends who were 13-14 and members of the local volunteer fire department, running into burning buildings with their adult colleagues.
Then again, one of those firefighters was caught setting fires to cause a call out to the Plectrons.
I know of 18 year olds who were offered jobs as apprentice plumbers or electricians.
Some of the professions mentioned require years of training that automatically places age limits on people. There are rare exceptions. I knew a girl in high school who graduated at 16 with perfect grades, was accepted into the accelerated medical school program at Boston University (combined bachelor and medical degree program in 6 years) and became a physician at age 22 (as a resident).

Now, letting a 13 yo behind the wheel in that situation...that's just bad parenting that cost unnecessary loss of life and grief for those poor people.
 

neil0311

Master Class
it should be at the very least 16. better still at 18.

That’s a little extreme. Every state allows 16 year olds to drive, as do most foreign countries.

In my state, Driver’s Ed along with 40 hours of parental time driving with your child is required for minors to get a license with limits.

The kid in question is 13 years old. I don’t think any state or nation allows 13 year olds to drive.
 
Why the hell would you bring that into this discussion ? It’s not even relevant since according to the law, he didn’t break any laws and driving is not a constitutionality protected right.

I agree with you about the driving part, but the only purpose that comment serves is to affirm your opinion on the Rittenhouse thing, which we all knew already and which has nothing to do with the topic at hand.

So let’s do this. You seem to be saying that the legal right to drive on public roads should be based on skill, not age. I agree with this by the way. That said, why not apply the same logic to carrying a concealed handgun ?
To point out context matters.

As for the rest of your bovine excrement screed, write on a piece of cardboard, fold it until it’s all sharp corners, and stuff into the orifice of your own choosing.

Make all the assumptions you want, but when you’re wrong—damn, you’re WRONG.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
To point out context matters.

As for the rest of your bovine excrement screed, write on a piece of cardboard, fold it until it’s all sharp corners, and stuff into the orifice of your own choosing.

Make all the assumptions you want, but when you’re wrong—damn, you’re WRONG.
Wow. Little uncalled for. Thought you guys were all supposed to be tolerant and all that crap.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
And I thought you guys liked straight talk.

Fact is, your post was uncalled for as well. You could have let it hang with the first sentence, buuut…no. You gotta make (exceedingly faulty) assumptions.

I just gave your attitude back with a little mustard.

Well Hans, your opinion about the Rittenhouse trial is well known and it's also not even remotely relevant to this thread. So if I may indulge you a little further, what about that is exceedingly wrong?

Also I would like your opinion about the skill based litmus test for concealed carry too. I'm not sure I'm as okay with that as I am with the driving thing, but it is an interesting discussion. Or could be.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
On the other hand and after re-reading the thread, I may have been a little - Not so subtly as it turns out- digging on you a little. I could explain myself, but instead I'll just say this. It's a big world full of all types of people. And political inclinations are a really bad barometer for judging people. Though I appreciate it when people are upfront about it. At any rate, I will apologize for my comments.
 
On the other hand and after re-reading the thread, I may have been a little - Not so subtly as it turns out- digging on you a little. I could explain myself, but instead I'll just say this. It's a big world full of all types of people. And political inclinations are a really bad barometer for judging people. Though I appreciate it when people are upfront about it. At any rate, I will apologize for my comments.
Thanks for that.
 
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