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Fell into the trap

Sld1959

Professional
Fell into the trap of the poor teacher/intelligently arrogant/life long knowledge owner.

Having had a shoulder injury and the onset of arthritis due to probably hundreds of dislocations over the years I found myself unable to shoot my favorite 70 lb recurve, and had to drop down to a lower poundage.

My son in law expressed an interest in learning to shoot and I gave my favorite take down recurve to him. What I failed to do was give him proper instruction. He has Shotwith me a couple times and I gave it no real consideration.

My daughter opened my eyes by explaining he was having issues. Today I plan on rectifying my gross negligence. Having thought about it part of the issue is: my own knowledge. My father started me in archery when I was like 2 years old. I don't remember EVER not knowing about archery, bows, how to shoot and set them up. It feels natural, organic, like it's knowledge/insticts you are simply born with like breathing. I forgot not everyone has this knowledge. And obviously not every one has as good a teacher as I did.

Today I rectify that arrogance, starting with an apology.
 
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Not teaching children of your own and giving them the knowledge too pass on can be a hinderance? My children are plagued with this from the pain I live in everyday. Rowing is the only activity that doesn't cause me pain. I don't have a boat. Archery is a favorite or at least 1 of! Throwing a ball, drawing a bow and most outdoor sports with arm motion puts me in pain. If I started having children 10 years earlier then my children could've had a fighting chance for an improved knowledge.
 

BobM

Hellcat
Fell into the trap of the poor teacher/intelligently arrogant/life long knowledge owner.

Having had a shoulder injury and the onset of arthritis due to probably hundreds of dislocations over the years I found myself unable to shoot my favorite 70 lb recurve, and had to drop down to a lower poundage.

My son in law expressed an interest in learning to shoot and I gave my favorite take down recurve to him. What I failed to do was give him proper instruction. He has Shotwith me a couple times and I gave it no real consideration.

My daughter opened my eyes by explaining he was having issues. Today I plan on rectifying my gross negligence. Having thought about it part of the issue is: my own knowledge. My father started me in archery when I was like 2 years old. I don't remember EVER not knowing about archery, bows, how to shoot and set them up. It feels natural, organic, like it's knowledge/insticts you are simply born with like breathing. I forgot not everyone has this knowledge. And obviously not every one has as good a teacher as I did.

Today I rectify that arrogance, starting with an apology.

Good for you, your daughter and son in law on recognizing and seeking help on correcting an oversight.
Thing that may be just as important is also spending more time one on one with your daughter and son in law?
 

BobM

Hellcat
Not teaching children of your own and giving them the knowledge too pass on can be a hinderance? My children are plagued with this from the pain I live in everyday. Rowing is the only activity that doesn't cause me pain. I don't have a boat. Archery is a favorite or at least 1 of! Throwing a ball, drawing a bow and most outdoor sports with arm motion puts me in pain. If I started having children 10 years earlier then my children could've had a fighting chance for an improved knowledge.
Can be a tough call at the time. Not always a reverse gear on time.
May still be able to verbally walk them through the paces and your techniques though?
 

cico7

Custom
Excellent catch, kudos to your daughter. I have considered an archery program for scouts at our gun range.
We have an archery range and we do scout programs for rifle and shotgun, but I do not have any kids to involve and no one wanted to assist in the program so it disappeared.
 
Excellent catch, kudos to your daughter. I have considered an archery program for scouts at our gun range.
We have an archery range and we do scout programs for rifle and shotgun, but I do not have any kids to involve and no one wanted to assist in the program so it disappeared.
When I was in Scouts back in '80 the National Jamboree was at Fort A.P. Hill in Virginia which was cool as ever! The Rangers had a rifle range for the Scouts too shoot at. While there I shot 48 and 49 on score and would always have 1 flyer (just 1 that wasn't a bullseye). The Ranger asked me how I was able too shoot so well? I told him I was brought up shooting and a country kid. He and I had a long talk about firearms and shooting techniques. He was surprised the knowledge I had for a 14 year old.
 
When I lived in Arkansas I had picked up a couple of crossbows from a woman liquidating here late husbands possessions for nearly nothing just after bow hunting season opened. I don't know about the laws now but at that time you could legally use a crossbow during bowhunting season. Never was a bowhunter but my best friend was so we decided to give it shot. Neither of us had shot a crossbow before but were well versed in rifles so "how hard can it be". That evening we setup a couple of portable tree stands on a friends farm for the next morning. About mid-morning he comes limping upto my tree stand looking like he went a couple of rounds with Mike Tyson asking if I would help him dress a deer. He was in his tree stand and a deer walked directly behind his tree and stopped at about 15 yds. With a bow he would've had to let it go but with the crossbow it was a different story. He wrapped his arm around the tree and leaned around the tree until he could get a shot and holding the crossbow one handed took the shot and dropped the deer. Part he didn't anticipate was the crossbow shot straight back and nailed him full face nearly breaking his nose as well as causing him to lose his grip and falling out of the tree breaking his collarbone.
Totally our fault. Stupidly hunting with unfamiliar weapons and no instruction. Long story short, he heeled and we gained a you dumbass story to laugh about over a beer with friends.
 
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