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How Should I Store My Guns?

Great read thanks Mike. I believe no matter how safe and secure we feel our firearms are that situation could always be better.
One question; we all see pictures of gun safes loaded with firearms, unlike what the article mentioned long guns are always muzzle up!
The article said “muzzle down” what is reasoning behind muzzle down versus muzzle up?

Moisture. Currently I keep my firearms in a closet located in the master bedroom that has multiple locks for security. For moisture concerns
I use DampRid to pull moisture from that small room. DampRid is also used in my camper to prevent moisture buildup and stale smelling air during storage.
 
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10mmLife

Professional
Founding Member
“The article said “muzzle down” what is reasoning behind muzzle down versus muzzle up?“

My guess on this Keystone would be to keep oil from leaking down into the action of the rifle, but, it’s just a guess.
Sounds pretty logical to me, though I do store mine muzzle up because my safe is on the 2nd floor and if there ever was a chance of an accidental discharge it would go through my roof not into living space below.
 
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RangerBill

Operator
An older fellow who I had much respect for stored his rifles muzzle down. When I asked his reasoning, he said he didn't like the weight of barreled actions resting on the wood stocks. (He had some very fine rifles and DB shotguns) Sounds reasonable, so that's the way I've been doing it for years.

I purchased the simplest of dessicant packs for my safe, a bag that you have to dry out in the oven every now and again, depending on the color of the indicator dots on the box. I live in western Washington, and we do get the rain and humidity. My safe is in the unheated attached garage, and I have never had a spot of rust or corrosion on any of my firearms. I'm in the habit of being in and out of the lock box often, so it's no big deal to pick up the box and check the indicators. If they have turned pink, throw the bag in a 240 degree oven for three hours, indicators turn blue, and your good for another month or two. No containers of water that need to be emptied, either.

Regards,
Bill
 
An older fellow who I had much respect for stored his rifles muzzle down. When I asked his reasoning, he said he didn't like the weight of barreled actions resting on the wood stocks. (He had some very fine rifles and DB shotguns) Sounds reasonable, so that's the way I've been doing it for years.

I purchased the simplest of dessicant packs for my safe, a bag that you have to dry out in the oven every now and again, depending on the color of the indicator dots on the box. I live in western Washington, and we do get the rain and humidity. My safe is in the unheated attached garage, and I have never had a spot of rust or corrosion on any of my firearms. I'm in the habit of being in and out of the lock box often, so it's no big deal to pick up the box and check the indicators. If they have turned pink, throw the bag in a 240 degree oven for three hours, indicators turn blue, and your good for another month or two. No containers of water that need to be emptied, either.

Regards,
Bill
If the action is bedded correctly to the stock there is no issue with the weight of the action on the wood.
 

RangerBill

Operator
If the action is bedded correctly to the stock there is no issue with the weight of the action on the wood.
You're correct, but many older rifles were not bedded. I have seen examples of older custom rifles whose stocks were meticulously hand fit (even the old single shots like '85 Winchesters, Stevens M52 or 44 1/2, Sharps rifles). Not an ounce of glass to be found.

Regards,
Bill
 

jumpinjoe

Custom
The issue as I have always understood it is that when standing muzzle up, the oils have a tendency to drain down in the wood, especially the stock. Once the wood is oil soaked, it's virtually impossible to ever refinish or even sometime to keep it tight to the receiver. It's a slow process but has ruined many a fine piece of wood.

regards,
jumpinjoe
 
Maybe it depends on how you put your gun safe.
Here's why:
if you store it muzzle up and it accidentally discharges, there's a possible chance that it can pass through the 2nd floor of your house. It also causes the oil leaks to go to the wood of your gun.

but if you store it muzzle down, you can easily pick it up and save space to your gun safe.
 

Bassbob

Professional
I don’t have a second story or a basement. Unloaded rifles go in the safe muzzle up. Loaded rifles go muzzle down. No particular reason, it just feels right to me.
 
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