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Properly mounting red dot sights

BobM

Hellcat
A good article with some interesting comments and thoughts worth paying attention to about mounting red dot sights ( RDS) to pistols.

Article isn't completely applicable from what read to all manufacturers of red dots or pistols, but gives some good general advice worth listening to and thinking about. Is good general advice from what read.

For example: Torque settings for fasteners can vary between mfg's, but mounting methods are usually similar. Article states fateners at 12 inch pounds, but that is for a particular application. It's usually 12 to 15 inch pounds from what seen for different applications, but settings can and do vary from one to another. A good idea is to check with manufacturer or their website for torque settings for particular application if info isn't included with RDS.

Another important example stated? Just simply cut or machine slide? Just simply drill holes in slide? Are valid reasons stated of doing or planning to and possible solutions for some firearms in article of what to think of and plan for when asking to mill slides or for mounting RDS such as importance of shear strength. That's a biggie. RDS mounting isn't always quite as simple as it may sound or some may think? But, it can be easier with some planning.

 
More threads are better regardless the size! Having bosses, to me is a great idea! Even with a 10mm and the Glock MOS I haven't had any issues with screw sheering. Whether it be a sig, s&w or glock from 9mm, 357sig, 40s&w, 10mm or 45acp not 1 have sheered a screw. They could've had bad screws? It happens. Better too have a screw break than have threads in the slide ruined.
 

BobM

Hellcat
More threads are better regardless the size! Having bosses, to me is a great idea! Even with a 10mm and the Glock MOS I haven't had any issues with screw sheering. Whether it be a sig, s&w or glock from 9mm, 357sig, 40s&w, 10mm or 45acp not 1 have sheered a screw. They could've had bad screws? It happens. Better too have a screw break than have threads in the slide ruined.
Yah, agree on more threads per inch being better and some screws that sheared may have been lower grade. Drilling out tiny screws can be a pain sometimes, the drill bits to drill them out are tiny and break easy if not careful.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
I would never mill a slide for a red dot. Even if I was a guy who wanted them on carry guns, which I am not.

When I mounted the Venom on my Walther Q5 I didn't have or look for any torque specs. I got the correct plate ( it came with 3) and I had to contact Vortex for the correct length screws ( although they are readily available at Lowes or Home Depot) and that was that. I used blue Loc-Tite on the screws mounting the plate to the slide and the screws mounting the sight to the plate. I used common sense and experience tightening the screws and with over 1000 rounds through the Walther now it's still zero'ed perfectly and tight on the gun.
 

Equalizer

Operator
I'm familiar with different grade of bolts and torque specs, ( I built many high performance engines) however, are tiny screws graded also? I agree with Tex, MORE is almost ALWAYS better than not enough.
IMO

You get the point....more beer, more steak, more fun, etc.etc
 

BobM

Hellcat
I'm familiar with different grade of bolts and torque specs, ( I built many high performance engines) however, are tiny screws graded also? I agree with Tex, MORE is almost ALWAYS better than not enough.
IMO

You get the point....more beer, more steak, more fun, etc.etc

Usually small screws are grade 2 or 5, but it can vary.

Excerpt from the fastener chart below:
"Screws are marked on the top of their heads, the exceptions being small (under about 1/4"), slotted and recessed head fasteners where there is insufficient room for head markings. A head with no markings is Grade 2, one with 3 lines spaced 120 degrees is Grade 5, and 6 lines spaced at 60 degree intervals is Grade 8."

Here's a grade chart for many common fastener types:
 
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