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Review: Is the SAINT Victor Duty-Grade?

gglass

Operator
The AR15 is a pattern rifle with a proven performance record that spans more than 50 years. As a pattern firearm, one should be able to take any component from one manufacturer's rifle and it should work in any other manufacturer's rifle of the same pattern. Where many of us have seen the wheels come off the AR15 cart is when a manufacturer decides to build a rifle that deviates from the pattern in some way like these:
  • Created a proprietary standard for their particular brand of rifle (don't see much of this happening now days.)
  • Uses a metal or polymer that is not of a sufficient grade like the original pattern
  • Skipped some recommended process in the construction of the rifle, like not staking the gas key or castle nut.
  • Not using the recommended torque for a component
As long as a manufacturer does not deviate from the pattern or the process in the making of their AR, there should be no discernible difference between the various brands. I believe that Springfield Armory held true to the AR15 pattern and build process, which means that their rifles should run just as well as any other top brand name of AR15 on the market.
 

Bassbob

Professional
The AR15 is a pattern rifle with a proven performance record that spans more than 50 years. As a pattern firearm, one should be able to take any component from one manufacturer's rifle and it should work in any other manufacturer's rifle of the same pattern. Where many of us have seen the wheels come off the AR15 cart is when a manufacturer decides to build a rifle that deviates from the pattern in some way like these:
  • Created a proprietary standard for their particular brand of rifle (don't see much of this happening now days.)
  • Uses a metal or polymer that is not of a sufficient grade like the original pattern
  • Skipped some recommended process in the construction of the rifle, like not staking the gas key or castle nut.
  • Not using the recommended torque for a component
As long as a manufacturer does not deviate from the pattern or the process in the making of their AR, there should be no discernible difference between the various brands. I believe that Springfield Armory held true to the AR15 pattern and build process, which means that their rifles should run just as well as any other top brand name of AR15 on the market.
According to at least one AR aficionado I know they’re the best quality straight out of the box AR in the mid price range.
 
Good Article/Review, and one I wish had come out years ago. I first joined the fraternity of AR owners 8 years ago. No prior military or LE experience, though I've been an avid Gun Owner and 2A Advocate for over 45 years.
As usual, with no prior knowledge, I relied upon friends and family's advice and purchased cheap, a DPMS Oracle under $500 at that time. I then learned that it was just that, "cheap." A mixture of mil-spec and commercial parts, assembled with the lowest level of tolerances the market would allow. I then spent several years and nearly twice what I paid for the carbine, turning it into a dependable firearm. Looking at it today, only the upper and lower receivers are all that remains of that original gun. Everything else, has been replaced. Now, I've an AR that I would depend upon for any task, but it took a lot of time and money to get it there. It was an expensive lesson to learn, but it was also a valuable one too. Now, I've built 3 other AR's from the 80% lower up, and I couldn't have done that without the knowledge I learned from my cheapo AR.
I share this with the hope that it will prevent someone else from making the mistake I did, in buying a too cheap gun. When it comes to any firearm, going "cheap" is something to avoid if possible. The original Oracle was an OK pinker, but not dependable enough for anything beyond that, and a plinker wasn't what I wanted or needed. I would have been financially better off investing in a Springfield, SIG or Ruger or a whole host of boutique manufacturers, than the DPMS cheapo (any of DPMS's middle or higher end offerings would have cost me less in the long run).
So my advice to anyone considering the AR platform, is to join forums, pick the brains of those with more experience, and research, research, research, before plunking down your hard earned money.
 

Mr. Untactical

Operator
Founding Member
Good Article/Review, and one I wish had come out years ago. I first joined the fraternity of AR owners 8 years ago. No prior military or LE experience, though I've been an avid Gun Owner and 2A Advocate for over 45 years.
As usual, with no prior knowledge, I relied upon friends and family's advice and purchased cheap, a DPMS Oracle under $500 at that time. I then learned that it was just that, "cheap." A mixture of mil-spec and commercial parts, assembled with the lowest level of tolerances the market would allow. I then spent several years and nearly twice what I paid for the carbine, turning it into a dependable firearm. Looking at it today, only the upper and lower receivers are all that remains of that original gun. Everything else, has been replaced. Now, I've an AR that I would depend upon for any task, but it took a lot of time and money to get it there. It was an expensive lesson to learn, but it was also a valuable one too. Now, I've built 3 other AR's from the 80% lower up, and I couldn't have done that without the knowledge I learned from my cheapo AR.
I share this with the hope that it will prevent someone else from making the mistake I did, in buying a too cheap gun. When it comes to any firearm, going "cheap" is something to avoid if possible. The original Oracle was an OK pinker, but not dependable enough for anything beyond that, and a plinker wasn't what I wanted or needed. I would have been financially better off investing in a Springfield, SIG or Ruger or a whole host of boutique manufacturers, than the DPMS cheapo (any of DPMS's middle or higher end offerings would have cost me less in the long run).
So my advice to anyone considering the AR platform, is to join forums, pick the brains of those with more experience, and research, research, research, before plunking down your hard earned money.
I can relate! Although I did go with what I consider a low-cost, but relatively safe bet for my first AR (Ruger AR556), it failed on me out of the box. Ruger made it right, and it's run flawlessly since, but I've also spent a good amount of hard-earned cash updating/upgrading, etc. Granted, a lot of that investment is optics, and other things of the sort, but I've replaced the BCG, stock, grip, baseplate, and trigger as well.

I've had the SAINT Victor in mind for awhile now... the more I think about it, the more I'm leaning toward making this my second AR. I'd like a rifle for which I only have to mount an optic/irons and be ready to go.
 

KillerFord1977

Professional
Founding Member
My victor has been thru mud, muck and lots of in between.
Why muck and mud? Well, when you trip at 2:00am in the mud with a thermal and miss the mud covered hole the hogs dug in the dark, the Victor getdirty in and out.
Has never failed to fire. Simple safety, cleaning steps, bore check and away we go usually in under 1 min to shoot some more hogs.
(Why firearm safety is very important, not only for shooter but others around)

The Victor is an excelent duty weapon for any Law Enforcement agency out there. My Officer buddy owns one as his duty weapon after using mine matter of fact.
 
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