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Should You Reload Your Own Ammo?

jumpinjoe

Professional
I'll pass on making rimfire ammo
Me too generally, and haven't even thought about it for many, many years ...... but way back in about mid-early 80's to late 90's I shot a whole lot of NRA Hunter's Pistol silhouette competitions around the south east. That was all center fire stuff, sometimes probably a couple thousand rounds a month. Along with that was NRA Hunter's Pistol Small-bore silhouette which was obviously .22 cal at that time. .22lr and/or .22mag was legal.

There was a time when a couple/few of us thought we knew better than the manufacturers and could find a better load for the mags, so we would pull the bullet and experiment with different loads of different powders simply replacing the original bullet in most cases. Now keep in mind there wasn't nearly the choices of powders back then that there is now, but even with the fewer choices we still thought we knew best .................... we had a few heart stopping/starting experiences, but generally speaking we all knew to be extremely careful.

More often than not we were SO careful, we were losing ground instead of making any improvements. So, we eventually gave it up. But there was many discussions whether or not "if only we had a set of dies for .22's we could really make a difference". LOL! So I've always been on the look out for a set of .22cal dies. Well, not 'always', but certainly whenever the thought came up.
 

BobM

Ronin

if this works out to be good for the military, maybe it could open the supply of brass for the consumer, rather than us go thru another shortage.
Would be nice, but is hard saying and unlikely in the long run. If anything, plastic or some sort of composite ammo will eventually replace brass for consumer use if it's as successful as brass. Doubt if composite ammo can be reloaded because it tends not to be as malleable as brass or other soft metals for now.

Brass, copper and lead are precious metals in a sense, used for many things other than the obvious ammo mentioned here. As time goes by, less and less of those metals seem to be available to the general public only to be replaced by plastics. Why? Beats me, possibly for batteries and other electronics? Lead is toxic in any amount may be part of it too? The copper in brass can also toxic to humans as well because it can help form harmful chemical reactions with other products, just not usually as much as lead.
 

BobM

Ronin
I always wondered what do they do with all that brass lying around and it gets picked up?

Good question TL. Have heard and seen different responses over the years.
Found some interesting answers on Quora. Link is below.

 

BobM

Ronin
Me too generally, and haven't even thought about it for many, many years ...... but way back in about mid-early 80's to late 90's I shot a whole lot of NRA Hunter's Pistol silhouette competitions around the south east. That was all center fire stuff, sometimes probably a couple thousand rounds a month. Along with that was NRA Hunter's Pistol Small-bore silhouette which was obviously .22 cal at that time. .22lr and/or .22mag was legal.

There was a time when a couple/few of us thought we knew better than the manufacturers and could find a better load for the mags, so we would pull the bullet and experiment with different loads of different powders simply replacing the original bullet in most cases. Now keep in mind there wasn't nearly the choices of powders back then that there is now, but even with the fewer choices we still thought we knew best .................... we had a few heart stopping/starting experiences, but generally speaking we all knew to be extremely careful.

More often than not we were SO careful, we were losing ground instead of making any improvements. So, we eventually gave it up. But there was many discussions whether or not "if only we had a set of dies for .22's we could really make a difference". LOL! So I've always been on the look out for a set of .22cal dies. Well, not 'always', but certainly whenever the thought came up.

Have heard of the dies too JJ, but have never seen any either. Possibly a snipe hunt? :)

Here's a video on reloading .22's. Is a bit cumbersome and awkward, but it can be done.
If remember right, the guys doing the reloading in the video also sell some of the supplies as well.

 

Old_Me

Custom
Have heard of the dies too JJ, but have never seen any either. Possibly a snipe hunt? :)

Here's a video on reloading .22's. Is a bit cumbersome and awkward, but it can be done.
If remember right, the guys doing the reloading in the video also sell some of the supplies as well.

after watching this video, i cannot phantom reloading 22's viable, or cost effective over say 9mm and up. 22's are really cheaper to buy.
 

BobM

Ronin
after watching this video, i cannot phantom reloading 22's viable, or cost effective over say 9mm and up. 22's are really cheaper to buy.
Exactly, very laborious and tedious. - but still doable.
Cheaper than buying? - That is if any are available on shelves?
Cost effective? - May depend on what's on hand and what isn't at the time too?
In a pinch, some may do what may be needed to fill different goals and needs may come to mind?
 

TEXASforLIFE

Hellcat
after watching this video, i cannot phantom reloading 22's viable, or cost effective over say 9mm and up. 22's are really cheaper to buy.
Exactly, very laborious and tedious. - but still doable.
Cheaper than buying? - That is if any are available on shelves?
Cost effective? - May depend on what's on hand and what isn't at the time too?
In a pinch, some may do what may be needed to fill different goals and needs may come to mind?
At the end of the video there is another for reloading centerfire primers with Prime All at $26.99 with and estimation of 2k primers that can be made. .0135 cents per primer average iirc. Or maybe what I found was on a Prime All search?
 

Old_Me

Custom
Exactly, very laborious and tedious. - but still doable.
Cheaper than buying? - That is if any are available on shelves?
Cost effective? - May depend on what's on hand and what isn't at the time too?
In a pinch, some may do what may be needed to fill different goals and needs may come to mind?
in my area, during the pandemic BS, many calibers of ammo was hard to find. the 2 stores that i go to, had .22LR on the shelfs.

that's what got me to buy a Glock 44. so that when say 9MM was non-existent, i at least got some range time with the 22.

but, then too, i have read on many sites, some people live far away from the "local" gun store(s).

some "benefits" to living in an urban/city.
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
after watching this video, i cannot phantom reloading 22's viable, or cost effective over say 9mm and up. 22's are really cheaper to buy.
Just casting those .22 cal bullets would be a 'put-off' to me in reloading them. Way back when we were playing with them it only involved pulling the bullet, then experimenting with different powder charges, then re-seating the original bullet.

I'm sorry, but what these guys are doing is totally asinine for the amount of labor involved in what they're doing. If they're truly enjoying it, more power to them. But I can't even see any justification in going through all that for .22's. And especially when using 'black' powder as a propellant. Who would intentionally ruin their .22 cal rifle by shooting 'black' powder through it?

I've reloaded literally 10's of 1,000's, maybe 100's of 1,000's of various center fire stuff and enjoyed every minute of it. Some for competitions, some for hunting, some just for 'shooting the chit'....... but I wouldn't sit there and scrape matches or caps for priming material for .22's for all the tea in China.

And lastly as an aside, when I was a kid something we did just about as stupid as this was to take a bicycle spoke out of an old wheel, bend it into a hand gun shape, scrape matches and put the scrapings into the end of the spoke adjuster sleeve, insert a small key chain bead over it, then hold a lighted match under it till it exploded and sent the chain bead flying. Wow! What fun. I don't know why now, but it was great fun way back then. :D:D:D:rolleyes:
 

BobM

Ronin
Just casting those .22 cal bullets would be a 'put-off' to me in reloading them. Way back when we were playing with them it only involved pulling the bullet, then experimenting with different powder charges, then re-seating the original bullet.

I'm sorry, but what these guys are doing is totally asinine for the amount of labor involved in what they're doing. If they're truly enjoying it, more power to them. But I can't even see any justification in going through all that for .22's. And especially when using 'black' powder as a propellant. Who would intentionally ruin their .22 cal rifle by shooting 'black' powder through it?

I've reloaded literally 10's of 1,000's, maybe 100's of 1,000's of various center fire stuff and enjoyed every minute of it. Some for competitions, some for hunting, some just for 'shooting the chit'....... but I wouldn't sit there and scrape matches or caps for priming material for .22's for all the tea in China.

And lastly as an aside, when I was a kid something we did just about as stupid as this was to take a bicycle spoke out of an old wheel, bend it into a hand gun shape, scrape matches and put the scrapings into the end of the spoke adjuster sleeve, insert a small key chain bead over it, then hold a lighted match under it till it exploded and sent the chain bead flying. Wow! What fun. I don't know why now, but it was great fun way back then. :D:D:D:rolleyes:

Hah, yah, more involved than I'd want to do on reloading .22's that way too.

Kids doing dumb stuff? Yup, quite a few neighborhood kids would make hand held "beer can cannons" that fired tennis balls too. Made out of typical household items at the time. Loud? Noise would shake and rattle any nearby windows. The tennis balls were out of sight and no where near to being found in the old river or fields.
 

youngolddude

Operator
The wife and I shoot cowboy action three times a month plus a few bigger matches. This would be unaffordable if I bought factory ammo if I could find it.
 

youngolddude

Operator
Finding bullets are not a problem, primers are the main issue, primarily small pistol primers. I just had 2,000 ,45 bullets delivered yesterday. I just started scrounging lead and will probably cast down the road.
 

Kisssofdeath

Operator
Should you reload your own ammo?

You should reload your own ammo if.....

1. You shoot a lot, say on average 100+ round per week or 5200+ per year.
2. You shoot cartridges like a 338 Lapua. These first two are money saving reasons.
3. You shoot cartridges no longer manufactured such as the Rem 7mm BR. Or something else obscure.
4. You can't find factory ammo to meet your accuracy requirements. For example, you want to shoot crows or prairie dogs at 500 yards.
5. You want to create a reload combination to give minimal recoil while still functioning in a semi-auto. Several benefits to that.
6. You want a/another hobby or just simply enjoy reloading.
7. You fear a total break down in society and want to be prepared. "I don't believe this will happen but some may".

I've reloaded since 1989. First handgun I loaded for was a Ruger Super Redhawk in 44 mag.
 
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