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Supermarket Food List: How To Prep Your Pantry for Survival

Old_Me

Hellcat
frankly, we do have a few canned foods, that we stock up normally. we check the expiration dates, in fact, we label the cans with the date of purchase as well. then, we toss them away, or open up and cook up rather than waste that food.

everything is in 1 location, for an easy grab & go.
 

The Night Rider

Master Class
This is one of those write a book or don't say anything topics. I'm a firm believer and OPSEC I'm not going to get into details but we don't waste food. It's too expensive and my wife and I both grew up in homes where three meals a day (or even eating at all) wasn't an everyday thing.

We cook in small amounts, we eat leftovers, at least once a week, my wife goes through the refrigerator and we have dinner out of the odds and ends that are left over. And it's not something that you would think of going together but it actually ends up usually tasting pretty good.

Meet is not a requirement in every meal. That's kind of hard on my wife because she's got this thing in her head where she does think meat should be a part of every meal and sometimes I have to tell her not to add meat to a meal that already has protein.

There is a difference between eating for enjoyment and eating to survive. I said I wasn't going to go into our Preps and I'm not but I will say that we've made a habit of adding a bag of rice and a bag of beans and some canned goods over and above to every grocery list. And we've been married for 25 years. Rice and beans can get boring but if that's all you got to eat you'll eat it. My point in saying that was at that's a small things that you can do right now that won't add a huge amount to your grocery bill and will definitely add up over time.
 

The Night Rider

Master Class
The story goes well with this topic.

When I was 18 or maybe 19 years old I was working construction in Florida. Some of my coworkers were LDS and I would ask them questions about what they believed.

So one day the leader of their group was telling me about the concept of having a two-year stock of food put away for Hard Times and he told me a story about a friend of his.

One day his friend came to him and asked if he could borrow some money to buy groceries because he was out of work. The leader asked his friend "What about your two year Supply?"
His friend replied "I can't use that that's for hard times."

The leader replied to his friend "What kind of times do you think these are?"

That one lesson that I learned from that discussion has stayed with me almost 40 years. The other lesson I learned is you never know what you're going to say to somebody just in passing that they're going to remember for the rest of their lives.
 

Sld1959

Professional
The trick to having a pantry is to only buy what you will eat. And then follow a strict fifo usage. When you use something from your cupboards you replace it from the pantry. Then you add that to your shopping list to refill.

Adding expiration dates in large script outside helps for old eyes to grab at a glance.

Saving shopping lists lists will help you study your own eating habits so you can increase or decrease quantities to keep your pantry balanced as to your preferences.

The only thing we do not eat regularly are some freeze dried foods for camping and emergency use in vehicles. I do however check them to be used and replaced twice a year on the time change days. Same goes for all batteries in use in flashlights and detectors.

This has worked for us for 42 years and now our daughter finally understands. They required me to break lockdown for a protein and toilet paper run to thier house. My wife and I however never felt any real lack. Between our pantry, and the seeming relative common sense most in our rural area displayed shortages were few and far between.
 
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HayesGreener

Professional
I grew up on a family farm raised by parents who were married during The Depression. My Dad farmed with a team of Morgan Horses on rented land, they lived in an "improved" log cabin, and they raised or grew everything they ate. During the Depression my Dad bought a rifle and a brick of ammunition, in part to hunt, and in part to defend the homestead because they did not know how bad things would get and he was concerned that people would be starving and come to take what they had from the farm. All my aunts and uncles came up in similar circumstances.

The horses were gone, and we had a tractor by the time I came along but these were meager beginnings.

We had no running water and an outhouse until I was in grade school. There was a hand pump in the back yard, plus a major convenience of a hand pump in the kitchen sink. Later when we had indoor plumbing, learning to do your business inside the house took some getting used to.

We had a smokehouse and under the smokehouse was a root cellar. My Mom canned hundreds of jars of vegetables every year that went into the root cellar, along with the potatoes and onions and smoked hams. When we built a new house years later, she insisted it have a root cellar so she could continue preserving food.

A freezer was a great luxury. Before we had a freezer, a rented freezer locker in town did the job. We butchered our own hogs and steers and chickens until I was in my early teens. My Dad taught me to hunt when I was old enough, so the menu was supplemented with rabbits and squirrels.

We went to the farm store and bought 100 chicks every spring. When the roosters became apparent, they were segregated until they were big enough to go into the freezer. The hens that failed to lay eggs followed the roosters into the freezer. My first job that I can remember on the farm was at about age 5 or 6, holding the chickens by the legs on the block while my Mom chopped their heads off with an axe. Imagine how the snowflakes would react to that nowadays. We had fried chicken for Sunday dinner every Sunday as long as I can remember.

For many years my Mom had an egg route in town, and that's how she got her cash for shopping for essentials at the grocery store and Woolworths and Sears.

My Dad was proud of the large garden he grew every year which provided fresh vegetables every day in summer and lots of beans, peas, corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, potatoes, and etc. for preserving and canning. His apple trees provided the best apples I ever ate. He worked the farm until he was 74.

Over the years we began relying more on the grocery stores for canned goods and fresh meat and produce, and I could see the old ways of self reliance going by the wayside. My Dad's garden grew up in weeds when he died at 82, and many of the old ways of America died with him and his contemporaries.

Today Mrs Greener goes to the grocery at least once or twice per week. I don't even grow a garden anymore although I have space to do so. I know there are people who still live by the old ways, plus there are plenty books and now videos on how to. But the vast majority of the population have no idea of where their food comes from, or what it takes to survive on the land.

If the economy, and food supplies were to collapse, most would be in shock and unable to get by. We find it hard to imagine it coming to this in America, but we are witnessing things occurring over the past two years that we would have thought impossible just a few short years ago. I can imagine a scenario where there are millions of acres of food in agricultural areas, but no way to get it processed or distributed. This has brought me to consider stocking some long term preserved food supplies. My grandchildren will probably wonder what all that crap is when going through my stuff for the estate sale, but maybe it's worth the peace of mind.
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HayesGreener

Professional
Was there a specific purpose for doing it that way or is that just the way it worked out?
It was built in the 1800's by German immigrants and most of the farms there had them, and barns that looked like Germany. I am guessing it was for economy of space and materials. It was quite cool in that root cellar. The smoking wood chamber was out back of the building and the smoke was piped in.
 

Invisibleflash

Operator
Brooms on the Prairie.jpg


I'm in the process of cutting out the bullshit distractions and getting down to biz...survival biz that is. I had slacked off for years after the relative times of plenty we had had.

Well...good luck to all!
 
I grew up on a family farm raised by parents who were married during The Depression. My Dad farmed with a team of Morgan Horses on rented land, they lived in an "improved" log cabin, and they raised or grew everything they ate. During the Depression my Dad bought a rifle and a brick of ammunition, in part to hunt, and in part to defend the homestead because they did not know how bad things would get and he was concerned that people would be starving and come to take what they had from the farm. All my aunts and uncles came up in similar circumstances.

The horses were gone, and we had a tractor by the time I came along but these were meager beginnings.

We had no running water and an outhouse until I was in grade school. There was a hand pump in the back yard, plus a major convenience of a hand pump in the kitchen sink. Later when we had indoor plumbing, learning to do your business inside the house took some getting used to.

We had a smokehouse and under the smokehouse was a root cellar. My Mom canned hundreds of jars of vegetables every year that went into the root cellar, along with the potatoes and onions and smoked hams. When we built a new house years later, she insisted it have a root cellar so she could continue preserving food.

A freezer was a great luxury. Before we had a freezer, a rented freezer locker in town did the job. We butchered our own hogs and steers and chickens until I was in my early teens. My Dad taught me to hunt when I was old enough, so the menu was supplemented with rabbits and squirrels.

We went to the farm store and bought 100 chicks every spring. When the roosters became apparent, they were segregated until they were big enough to go into the freezer. The hens that failed to lay eggs followed the roosters into the freezer. My first job that I can remember on the farm was at about age 5 or 6, holding the chickens by the legs on the block while my Mom chopped their heads off with an axe. Imagine how the snowflakes would react to that nowadays. We had fried chicken for Sunday dinner every Sunday as long as I can remember.

For many years my Mom had an egg route in town, and that's how she got her cash for shopping for essentials at the grocery store and Woolworths and Sears.

My Dad was proud of the large garden he grew every year which provided fresh vegetables every day in summer and lots of beans, peas, corn, tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, potatoes, and etc. for preserving and canning. His apple trees provided the best apples I ever ate. He worked the farm until he was 74.

Over the years we began relying more on the grocery stores for canned goods and fresh meat and produce, and I could see the old ways of self reliance going by the wayside. My Dad's garden grew up in weeds when he died at 82, and many of the old ways of America died with him and his contemporaries.

Today Mrs Greener goes to the grocery at least once or twice per week. I don't even grow a garden anymore although I have space to do so. I know there are people who still live by the old ways, plus there are plenty books and now videos on how to. But the vast majority of the population have no idea of where their food comes from, or what it takes to survive on the land.

If the economy, and food supplies were to collapse, most would be in shock and unable to get by. We find it hard to imagine it coming to this in America, but we are witnessing things occurring over the past two years that we would have thought impossible just a few short years ago. I can imagine a scenario where there are millions of acres of food in agricultural areas, but no way to get it processed or distributed. This has brought me to consider stocking some long term preserved food supplies. My grandchildren will probably wonder what all that crap is when going through my stuff for the estate sale, but maybe it's worth the peace of mind.
View attachment 28937
Sounds like home! I grew up the same way.
 
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