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Training with a 22, not your carry gun

TSiWRX

Custom
^ Yup, that's definitely yet another problem.

We've seen how awfully the extra-heavy trigger pull in their modified Glocks negatively affected NYPD officers' marksmanship capabilities, and we also know from modern studies that raw grip strength helps with marksmanship overall - with compromised hand/finger strength and/or dexterity, the long and sometimes heavy trigger path of DA revolvers is definitely something that should be looked at by anyone who may be thinking about using this type of firearm (regardless of caliber) for self-defense.

For every consideration that impacts able-bodied shooters, those concerns redouble themselves when we look at shooters with physical shortfalls due to disease and/or age.
 

wmg1299

Professional
I've been bringing .22LR handguns with me to the range much more often since ammo prices spiked. I normally wouldn't recommend Taurus products, but the TX22 is an excellent gun. My TX22 is the most reliable rimfire semi-auto I have ever owned, and the 16-round mags are awesome at the range.

I'll often bring either my Ruger LCR in .22LR or a Heritage SA revolver (Rough Rider or Barkeep) in my range bag. The LCR's trigger is a little heavy, but the revolvers are great for making ammo last longer. I consider my rimfire shooting to be more for fun than for training purposes. Even though I'm shooting the .22's for fun, I think all trigger time is beneficial.
 

tapehoser

Operator
Early on in my shooting experiences, I was taught by a master gunsmith. He not only taught me how to shoot, but taught me reloading and even left me his gunsmithing books and RCBS Ammomaster (and other components) when he died.

When he was teaching me to shoot, if he noticed any sort of flinch developing, he would switch me out to his Ruger 10/22. After I'd emptied out a couple mags without flinching, we'd switch back to the regular stuff - 9mm, 10mm, etc. I've even taken to training in my house with my unloaded pistols regularly. I rack the slide, point with the laser at the wall, and pull the trigger. With each shot I am careful not to flinch. If that laser moves from its spot on the wall, I know I need to settle down.

That's the only "training with a 22" that I've ever done.
 
I get the ability to train without spending money on more expensive ammo, but I think you also need to be sure you’re training with real world scenarios, including recoil, capacity, possible malfunctions, etc.

If you just want to practice drawing from a holster or other non-live fire procedures, then you can do dry fire with or without snap caps.

Personally, I don’t own any .22 firearms. Other than plinking with .22 for the pure joy of it, or teaching kids or other beginners, there’s not much value for me.
 

HansGruber

Hellcat
I get the ability to train without spending money on more expensive ammo, but I think you also need to be sure you’re training with real world scenarios, including recoil, capacity, possible malfunctions, etc.

If you just want to practice drawing from a holster or other non-live fire procedures, then you can do dry fire with or without snap caps.

Personally, I don’t own any .22 firearms. Other than plinking with .22 for the pure joy of it, or teaching kids or other beginners, there’s not much value for me.
“Real world scenarios” is, to me…a bit of a cop-out.

What, exactly, does that mean?

Because, if you look at the numbers…it’s most likely one to two shots, on one target, and the fight is OVER…regardless of caliber.

So, really, .22 training makes a TON of sense when one looks objectively at the data.

Just sayin’.
 

cico7

Master Class
I get the ability to train without spending money on more expensive ammo, but I think you also need to be sure you’re training with real world scenarios, including recoil, capacity, possible malfunctions, etc.

If you just want to practice drawing from a holster or other non-live fire procedures, then you can do dry fire with or without snap caps.

Personally, I don’t own any .22 firearms. Other than plinking with .22 for the pure joy of it, or teaching kids or other beginners, there’s not much value for me.
I cant train as much as I would like with 45 or 9 due to ammo, I like the 22lr. I also use it to help train others.
Training is the main use of the 22, cost is the 2nd reason, and last-it's a lot of fun.
 
I cant train as much as I would like with 45 or 9 due to ammo, I like the 22lr. I also use it to help train others.
Training is the main use of the 22, cost is the 2nd reason, and last-it's a lot of fun.

I’m not knocking anyone who trains with .22, but for me, I prefer to train with the actual firearms that I use for carry and home defense.

I’ve had no issues getting ammo over the last year or so. Was it more expensive? Sure. But supply has always been there, and I’m able to absorb the cost. I have a stock of 9mm and 5.56/.223, and for the first time I bought a 1911 in .45ACP (despite resisting for a long time), and was able to get ammo for it without a problem. I routinely shoot 100-200 rounds every 1-2 weeks.

I’ve tried shooting .22 and for me, it might as well be Airsoft. Personal preference. I want the recoil, etc. To me, training means the same experience (less the stress) that would be in a real use of the firearm. If I can shoot a pistol that has no recoil and can be held with one hand…what training value is there to me? That’s what I mean with the “real world” comment.

Please don’t take it as anything but my opinion and preference and you’re free to disagree.
 

David N.

Professional
Founding Member
I’m not knocking anyone who trains with .22, but for me, I prefer to train with the actual firearms that I use for carry and home defense.

I’ve had no issues getting ammo over the last year or so. Was it more expensive? Sure. But supply has always been there, and I’m able to absorb the cost. I have a stock of 9mm and 5.56/.223, and for the first time I bought a 1911 in .45ACP (despite resisting for a long time), and was able to get ammo for it without a problem. I routinely shoot 100-200 rounds every 1-2 weeks.

I’ve tried shooting .22 and for me, it might as well be Airsoft. Personal preference. I want the recoil, etc. To me, training means the same experience (less the stress) that would be in a real use of the firearm. If I can shoot a pistol that has no recoil and can be held with one hand…what training value is there to me? That’s what I mean with the “real world” comment.

Please don’t take it as anything but my opinion and preference and you’re free to disagree.
Handgun ammo is still not readily available in my area, so .22 is the only other option. I was lucky enough to get a few boxes of 9mm over the summer, so I can mix in some range time with my EDC. I never considered using a substitute for my EDC, but you must adapt to the situation somehow.
 
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