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W748 in .308

benstt

Custom
Founding Member
I went to my local reloading store today and they were out of 4895, as one would expect right now. They were also out of 4064 and Varget and their AA2520 got recalled. So I got a pound of W748. Anyone have any tips on using it in a 150 or 175gr .308? I've heard it's pretty temperature sensitive and here in MN we got from -20F to 95F+.
 

SATRP

Master Class
Founding Member
Hi bennet,

The .308 Win is an enigma. It is unlike almost all other big game cartridges. Shorter barrels have minimal effect on velocity. It has phenomenal inherent accuracy. It works geometrically better than its comparatively small case capacity would tend to indicate on all North American big game. And it's very easy to hand load. The .308 Win might just be North America's perfect big game hunting cartridge.

Ken Waters' Pet Loads indicates that 748 will work in the .308 Win, but it's not optimum.

Working off of my experiences, making less-than optimum work produced less-than optimum results.

The .308 Win is our most popular big game cartridge. But for excellent quality semis chambered for the .308 Win, the '06, in my opinion, would have never lost ranking to the .308 Win. The irony is they're virtually identical cartridges in terms of performance on North American big game. Anyway, its popularity undoubtedly is a cause of scarcity of optimum powder. Based upon what I've learned the expensive way, try to find optimum powder. A good way to dial in best are small vendors who'll place your name on waiting lists. Or you can try to borrow powder from another loader. If you're left in the quandary of trying to make less-than optimum work, utilize every possible advantage: powder charges, primers, brass, bullets and pray for excellent results.

Here's my take on temperature sensitive power. I've hunted many decades in the Rockies. I've hunted in single digit temperatures and in t-shirts (bull elk rut). My take is temperature sensitivity is marketing strategy. I've never, ever experienced a problem with old-school H-4831. Hunting Rocky Mountain big game within the spectrum of freezing cold to beach lounging temperatures, powder ignited flawlessly signaling the onset of really hard work.

If the US military's version of H-4831 performed flawlessly in scorching temperatures of our WWII Pacific Island Hopping campaign and in miserably cold, fathoms below freezing temperatures in North Korea, it'll work flawlessly in all North America big game hunting temperatures. My old school .270 Win load using old school H-4831 will print approx .25" groups. Hence, I'm skeptical of allegedly temp sensitive powders.
 

benstt

Custom
Founding Member
Hi bennet,

The .308 Win is an enigma. It is unlike almost all other big game cartridges. Shorter barrels have minimal effect on velocity. It has phenomenal inherent accuracy. It works geometrically better than its comparatively small case capacity would tend to indicate on all North American big game. And it's very easy to hand load. The .308 Win might just be North America's perfect big game hunting cartridge.

Ken Waters' Pet Loads indicates that 748 will work in the .308 Win, but it's not optimum.

Working off of my experiences, making less-than optimum work produced less-than optimum results.

The .308 Win is our most popular big game cartridge. But for excellent quality semis chambered for the .308 Win, the '06, in my opinion, would have never lost ranking to the .308 Win. The irony is they're virtually identical cartridges in terms of performance on North American big game. Anyway, its popularity undoubtedly is a cause of scarcity of optimum powder. Based upon what I've learned the expensive way, try to find optimum powder. A good way to dial in best are small vendors who'll place your name on waiting lists. Or you can try to borrow powder from another loader. If you're left in the quandary of trying to make less-than optimum work, utilize every possible advantage: powder charges, primers, brass, bullets and pray for excellent results.

Here's my take on temperature sensitive power. I've hunted many decades in the Rockies. I've hunted in single digit temperatures and in t-shirts (bull elk rut). My take is temperature sensitivity is marketing strategy. I've never, ever experienced a problem with old-school H-4831. Hunting Rocky Mountain big game within the spectrum of freezing cold to beach lounging temperatures, powder ignited flawlessly signaling the onset of really hard work.

If the US military's version of H-4831 performed flawlessly in scorching temperatures of our WWII Pacific Island Hopping campaign and in miserably cold, fathoms below freezing temperatures in North Korea, it'll work flawlessly in all North America big game hunting temperatures. My old school .270 Win load using old school H-4831 will print approx .25" groups. Hence, I'm skeptical of allegedly temp sensitive powders.
That's good insight, thanks much.
 
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