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What would you recommend to a non-gun person for concealed carry?

youngolddude

Master Class
Chances are this theoretical person won't spend over $800 and probably lower. They will want to also share this gun with their partner. Said weapon should be able to be concealed on a person or in a purse/bag. Should be able to shoot to minute of bad guy within 21 feet. The grip should reasonably fit both small and larger hands. Those that are painful to shoot will probably not be carried. Whadya say?
 
S&W 43C or 351C.

.22LR or .22 Mag, respectively.

Not painful, easy to shoot, crazy accurate, and inexpensive ammo.

Revolvers work better for non-gun people, as well.

If you want a larger caliber…look for an older, all steel 3” S&W 36 (Chief’s Special) or 60 (stainless version) in .38.
 

HayesGreener

Professional
First, a concealed weapons course that involves shooting a course of fire. Novices often do not know what suits them until they handle the gun and get to the range and shoot it. I have had many novice students, men and women, show up for a class with a gun that someone else chose for them only to discover their gun did not fit, or they could not operate the action. Often the recommendations came from a gun counter clerk or a friend who was well meaning but just didn't know. I was especially frustrated with the person who showed up with an Airweight revolver, only to discover they could not tolerate the recoil. I always had a selection of handguns for my students to handle and try for fit, and to determine if they could operate the controls. My test for suitability for hand strength was to have the student operate the slide to its full limit 10 times in succession. If they could not do that they were probably not suited to a semi-auto.

With that said, you would be hard pressed to find a pistol today that beats the Sig P365. If hand strength is an issue, the S&W M&P EZ is an option. And of course, steel revolvers are always an option for the recoil sensitive.
 

KI4WTF

Elite
Sharp stick, pocket rock, oh... almost forgot I think a whistle is recommended by most non gun type organizations.
 

Recusant

Professional
S&W 43C or 351C.

.22LR or .22 Mag, respectively.

Not painful, easy to shoot, crazy accurate, and inexpensive ammo.

Revolvers work better for non-gun people, as well.

If you want a larger caliber…look for an older, all steel 3” S&W 36 (Chief’s Special) or 60 (stainless version) in .38.
First, a concealed weapons course that involves shooting a course of fire. Novices often do not know what suits them until they handle the gun and get to the range and shoot it. I have had many novice students, men and women, show up for a class with a gun that someone else chose for them only to discover their gun did not fit, or they could not operate the action. Often the recommendations came from a gun counter clerk or a friend who was well meaning but just didn't know. I was especially frustrated with the person who showed up with an Airweight revolver, only to discover they could not tolerate the recoil. I always had a selection of handguns for my students to handle and try for fit, and to determine if they could operate the controls. My test for suitability for hand strength was to have the student operate the slide to its full limit 10 times in succession. If they could not do that they were probably not suited to a semi-auto.

With that said, you would be hard pressed to find a pistol today that beats the Sig P365. If hand strength is an issue, the S&W M&P EZ is an option. And of course, steel revolvers are always an option for the recoil sensitive.
Both are excellent responses. While we may focus on recoil novices also focus on noise. Coming out of a 4" barrel even a .22LR is loud. A novice should start out with good ear protection so they don't finch, and a caliber he or she is comfortable with. Like HansGruber recommends, start with a .22LR. Plan on more than one range trip. Also, make it an enjoyable experience and don't rush it.
 

Pitdogg2

Professional
First thing is some training and handling many different types of handguns. I can't tell you how many times I've heard this "Why does it need to be so heavy" "I'll never carry it it's too heavy"
First timers can have unrealistic expectations.
Many times I've taken newbies shooting and I take all my handguns. Suddenly you see they have picked a favorite and can actually shoot it good.
We work from there.
Many times what we experienced shooters think is a light weight handgun it's like a 30# brick to them.
Give them a light gun with a suitable caliber and they cringe every time they pull the trigger.
Time and patience is needed to get them in the comfort zone.
 

somorris

Custom
Founding Member
When I took my son, grandson and daughter-in-law to the range, my DIL had never even held a gun. We had a couple of semi-auto 9mm’s, a semi-auto 380, a 38 Spl. loaded with +P, and my old .22 LR revolver. My DIL shot the 380 and one of the 9mm’s, but much preferred the .22. In fact, after one time, she only wanted to shoot the .22. It has a 6” barrel, still loud but not like the other choices. For a total newbie, I would also recommend starting with a .22.
 

Old_Me

Professional
Once again I am reminded, there are no stupid questions. Only stupid answers...
i wonder "if" what was said, was done so in "jest"

but i too agree that a revolver may be best.

at least no major worries of not having a safety to deal with, or any possible malfunctions of a autoloader.
 

Ranger715

Elite
There are guns which are good to learn with. There are guns which are good for carrying. They're not usually the same. The "one gun for all people for all purposes" is mythical. Why do you think there are so many choices on the market? Why do you think we all own numerous guns?

For the average person looking for that first and maybe only handgun, I just recommend a medium sized 9mm semi auto, using the Glock 19 as an archetype. Small enough to carry. Big enough to comfortably shoot. Good capacity. Most brands allow variable grip configurations. Ubiquitous varieties of ammo. Easy to learn to shoot. Many holsters available. Middle of the road price range.

Perfect for everyone? Of course not. Good choice for most? Yes.
 

KI4WTF

Elite
i wonder "if" what was said, was done so in "jest"

but i too agree that a revolver may be best.

at least no major worries of not having a safety to deal with, or any possible malfunctions of a autoloader.
Thank you, just trying to be funny as the first line of the example said "non gun person" I'm about as far from an elitist snob as you can get. I figured I had made enough comments here that no one would see my comment otherwise.
 

Old_Me

Professional
Thank you, just trying to be funny as the first line of the example said "non gun person" I'm about as far from an elitist snob as you can get. I figured I had made enough comments here that no one would see my comment otherwise.
i found that when i said something that was supposed to be meant as "funny", i put a (J/K) at the end, or a :ROFLMAO:
 
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Bloodknight

Master Class
Founding Member
For those of you living in the large cities.I would suggest the following
 

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