testtest

1911 & Wilson Shok-Buff ?

TidalWave

Professional
To anybody who uses WC Shok Buffs, got a few questions…
By the numbers:

1. How long have you used them?
2. Notice it causing any wear or stress someplace you wouldn’t expect?
3. Do you notice reduced recoil ? I.e does it actually help getting back on target?
4. Did you keep your stock recoil spring or go with their 18lb spring kit? ( if you know the reason for the 18lb, pls let me know).
5. Does the SB cause my spring to wear out faster ?
6. Are these things worth it?

Thanks in advance and apologies for any silly questions…

T Wave
 

Annihilator

SAINT
Founding Member
I have used these in the past, not good for the commander or officer style pistols. They do work good at reducing some felt recoil, but also they limit the travel of the slide coming back, what I mean is, they take up some space and not letting the slide come all the way back, some guns may not extract right with these installed, but I never had this experience, just going by what my gunsmith relayed to me, so for a defensive pistol, I would probably pass on using them, just my opinion, also if your concerned about battering of the slide to frame, do what I do, I install a 18 1/2 lb variable rate spring in my .45 1911’s.
 
Last edited:

Bassbob

Ronin
I have used these in the past, not good for the commander or officer style pistols. They do work good at reducing some felt recoil, but also they limit the travel of the slide coming back, what I mean is, they take up some space and not letting the slide come all the way back, some guns may not extract right with these installed, but I never had this experience, just going by what my gunsmith relayed to me, so for a defensive pistol, I would probably pass on using them, just my opinion.
Knew it was one. It's been a very long time since I tried one and I don't remember the exact cause of failure, but I do know the gun jammed/stopped running. Of course it wasn't a tuned 1911, it was an Auto Ordinance if I remember right. Either that or an old GI Colt.
 

TidalWave

Professional
Good info Anni and thanks…
It did make me wonder why you’d put a buffer in to reduce impact (potential damage) and recoil but then put in a heavier spring? Does the one thing cancel out the other, and if so what’s the point?

JMB designed it without a buffer. That says something.

But I’ve got one now and gonna try it unless anybody knows of serious potential problems. My purpose is the felt recoil reduction.
 

TidalWave

Professional
Knew it was one. It's been a very long time since I tried one and I don't remember the exact cause of failure, but I do know the gun jammed/stopped running. Of course it wasn't a tuned 1911, it was an Auto Ordinance if I remember right. Either that or an old GI Colt.
Yikes- that experience is def NOT what I want !
 

Pitdogg2

Custom
I've used them in my Kimber 1911 never any problems. They've never been beat up, they're on a full length guide rod. My last one was on it for close to 8-10 years. I bought all new because the rest though never used looked ruff, so I bought new.
 
Last edited:

Snake45

Elite
I've used them in several 1911s, both full-size and Commander. I put them in mainly to reduce shock/wear to the frame and slide. They didn't adversely affect functioning. Reduce felt recoil? Maybe a little.

BUT...

After I'd had them in my guns for several years, I went to check out one I hadn't shot in a long time. When I racked the slide open, it locked up. Turns out the buffer had disintegrated into chunks and crumbs. Took me a while to get that gun apart and cleaned out. I blame the disintegration on lube soaking into the buffer and affecting it somehow. (I've seen a very similar reaction between naphtha and styrene plastic in my model-building work.) I later found similar deterioration in two other guns.

So, these days, I advise, put a buffer in your gun for a range session if you like, but take it out afterward for storage. You never know when you might need the gun to actually WORK! :oops:;)
 

TidalWave

Professional
Another question , gents.
Is the difference in spring weight due to different lengths? or does metal thickness or coiling make the diff?
I’ve never compared them. But heard about testing the poundage.
 

Annihilator

SAINT
Founding Member
Another question , gents.
Is the difference in spring weight due to different lengths? or does metal thickness or coiling make the diff?
I’ve never compared them. But heard about testing the poundage.
Not sure on this, but I do know too heavy a spring is almost as bad as a worn spring, and I never go higher then the 18 1/2 spring in my .45’s.
 

Annihilator

SAINT
Founding Member
I used the shok-buffs in my AMT government model in .45, since it had a cast frame and wasn’t sure how the slide was made, it did like others said gets chewed up pretty fast, lots of people use them with no issues. My Sig 1911 comes and uses the flat recoil springs.
 
To anybody who uses WC Shok Buffs, got a few questions…
By the numbers:

1. How long have you used them?
2. Notice it causing any wear or stress someplace you wouldn’t expect?
3. Do you notice reduced recoil ? I.e does it actually help getting back on target?
4. Did you keep your stock recoil spring or go with their 18lb spring kit? ( if you know the reason for the 18lb, pls let me know).
5. Does the SB cause my spring to wear out faster ?
6. Are these things worth it?

Thanks in advance and apologies for any silly questions…

T Wave
I've used them in a Colt Lightweight Commander with Railed Power Mags (Chip McCormick) with no problems. Even though they reduced slide travel, as long as your magazine springs are strong, the next cartridge will be in position when the slide moves forward. Full size 1911s have no problems whatsoever utilizing WC Shok Buffs. Unfortunately, I only had the Colt a short period of time, so I can't say if other issues won't come along.
Perhaps you should consider installing one of Colt's delrin recoil spring guides (Delta Elite 10mm). For a full size 1911, you should be able to just drop them in, along with the dual recoil springs. For a commander 1911, you will have to shorten the delrin guides to make them fit. Delrin is easy to machine. Colt claims the delrin guides last for about 10,000 rounds; don't forget that's based on 10mm.
 

krunchnik

Master Class
My son purchased a new STI Spartan IV back in 2014-first range trip was a bust-constant feed problems-
He brought the pistol over and we broke it down to find a shock buff in the Commander length pistol-
It is a 9mm-no one needs a buffer in a 9mm 1911-
Removed buffer and next time he went to range it functioned correctly-and still does-I now have the pistol-
 
Top