testtest

Build the Ultimate Reloading Bench

BobM

Hellcat
An interesting newer article about building a more involved and fairly sturdy reloading bench. Has basic material list, plans and some good ideas like using T-Tracks to enable moving out of the way or change placement and using bench top mounted devices. Are some good ideas and pics to help visualize ideas used in article.

This reloading bench uses simple sturdy threaded pipe legs and flanges with some unique ideas like only using front legs and being mounted and stabilized in rear by a ledger board. Building the bench could or would involve a few different skills and tools like carpentry, plumbing and minor electrical work to do yourself or a person may be able to construct with the aid of others in the trades and possibly from the help of some home improvement stores.

On placement, do not forget about possible electric outlets or work that may be involved for some electrical devices and or task lighting. A good lighting setup can avoid possible visual headaches and mistakes. Good ventilation is another consideration sometimes overlooked.

A good sturdy reloading bench can come in different designs and flavors to match needs and placement. Some reloading benches involve using doors, drawers and shelving, can never have enough storage! Work benches of any sort can greatly vary in construction using wood, steel or design and reloading benches are little different. Good and sturdy construction can help, work benches are generally solidly mounted to floors and or walls and fairly heavy, but thoughts and designs can vary.

Are tons of reloading and other work bench ideas in use and out there to pick and choose from or so it seems. This article uses a few of those. An advantage of building your own reloading bench sometimes overlooked is a person can design in and build to suit their needs and abilities like height, width or space. Another advantage to building your own bench is sometimes using materials already on hand or available thereby reducing costs.

 

Recusant

Professional
An interesting newer article about building a more involved and fairly sturdy reloading bench. Has basic material list, plans and some good ideas like using T-Tracks to enable moving out of the way or change placement and using bench top mounted devices. Are some good ideas and pics to help visualize ideas used in article.

This reloading bench uses simple sturdy threaded pipe legs and flanges with some unique ideas like only using front legs and being mounted and stabilized in rear by a ledger board. Building the bench could or would involve a few different skills and tools like carpentry, plumbing and minor electrical work to do yourself or a person may be able to construct with the aid of others in the trades and possibly from the help of some home improvement stores.

On placement, do not forget about possible electric outlets or work that may be involved for some electrical devices and or task lighting. A good lighting setup can avoid possible visual headaches and mistakes. Good ventilation is another consideration sometimes overlooked.

A good sturdy reloading bench can come in different designs and flavors to match needs and placement. Some reloading benches involve using doors, drawers and shelving, can never have enough storage! Work benches of any sort can greatly vary in construction using wood, steel or design and reloading benches are little different. Good and sturdy construction can help, work benches are generally solidly mounted to floors and or walls and fairly heavy, but thoughts and designs can vary.

Are tons of reloading and other work bench ideas in use and out there to pick and choose from or so it seems. This article uses a few of those. An advantage of building your own reloading bench sometimes overlooked is a person can design in and build to suit their needs and abilities like height, width or space. Another advantage to building your own bench is sometimes using materials already on hand or available thereby reducing costs.

Very nice!
 
I agree on the butcher's block for sure (1.5-2"thick)! T-tracks getting powder, primers and other small stuff in, not so much? Like the idea of it! The outlet location I would put it underneath or vertical on left and/or right outside of legs. Using pipe and outlet bases to screw into makes it strong. Great for wood, but a pain on concrete!
 
That's an interesting article, thanks for sharing.
I got a 9 foot Craftsman steel bench from a friend when her husband died. I fastened a piece of plywood to every press I own and drilled a hole in the same location at the rear. I then drilled a hole in the bench top and fastened a t-nut beneath the hole so the presses can be mounted with one bolt.

t nut.jpg
 
That's an interesting article, thanks for sharing.
I got a 9 foot Craftsman steel bench from a friend when her husband died. I fastened a piece of plywood to every press I own and drilled a hole in the same location at the rear. I then drilled a hole in the bench top and fastened a t-nut beneath the hole so the presses can be mounted with one bolt.

View attachment 23383
I didn't think about those? That would be great for r and i as I do on occasion.
 

BobM

Hellcat
That's an interesting article, thanks for sharing.
I got a 9 foot Craftsman steel bench from a friend when her husband died. I fastened a piece of plywood to every press I own and drilled a hole in the same location at the rear. I then drilled a hole in the bench top and fastened a t-nut beneath the hole so the presses can be mounted with one bolt.

View attachment 23383

Thanks and you're welcome youngolddude, T -nuts are a great idea for hooking up and detaching many things quickly!
 

BobM

Hellcat
I didn't think about those? That would be great for r and i as I do on occasion.

Might be old age setting in there as well as here too? :)
T- nuts skip my mind from time to time as well, just like concrete or other anchors can. Can be many hat's to wear and needed experience in construction of most anything. Work benches are no exception. The devil's in the details?
 
I scored this 4X8 workbench off Craigslist for $40 and turned it into my multi-purpose work bench, which spends the majority of time as my reloading bench. Out of the picture on the right, is my Dillon primer pocket swager.

Once I get all my winter reloading done, and I'm well stocked on ammo for the next year (should be done in a few weeks), I'll put it all away and get an old Honda CT-70 up there for some work.

i-8gHrGV4-X4.jpg
 
I scored this 4X8 workbench off Craigslist for $40 and turned it into my multi-purpose work bench, which spends the majority of time as my reloading bench. Out of the picture on the right, is my Dillon primer pocket swager.

Once I get all my winter reloading done, and I'm well stocked on ammo for the next year (should be done in a few weeks), I'll put it all away and get an old Honda CT-70 up there for some work.

i-8gHrGV4-X4.jpg
How new is your 550? I have 2 and 1 is almost 38 years old and still ticking! The other is about 4 years or a hair more old.
 
My reloading set up in its normal state (messy). The pool noodle keeps my truck from hitting the bench when I park it inside the garage. 3 gallon water jugs are for brass. Ammo cans for when I run out of plastic ammo boxes. 650 is permanently mounted. All others are mounted on plywood and attached w/ one bolt. T-nut is on underside of bench. Tunes via cd, radio or laptop. Cleaning bench is on other side of garage and too messy to show. :rolleyes:
IMG_20220114_080725871.jpg
IMG_20220114_080818632.jpg
 
Top