testtest

For FORD owners that don't know

Annihilator

SAINT
Founding Member
Hey Anni, I wasn't referring to your situation at all ..... in fact I absolutely agree you should have gotten better wear than that or at least a better response/result. I was just talking 'tires' in general and for general information.

I certainly meant on offense towards you man! Sorry if it came across that way! (y)(y)(y)
No problem Joe, didn’t take it like that, that was the first thing they asked me by the dealer, Chrysler and Firestone, I was just saying all was like it should be on my side, anyway our last 5 vehicles were from Chrysler, after this, no more, all is cool Joe…..no worries
 

TEXASforLIFE

Hellcat
While it's true car dealers/manufacturers do buy tires in volume, they are purchased on a 'Just in Time' inventory plan and thus usually are not more than 18 mos old when sold on the new vehicle, so age is rarely a problem. Occasionally they might sit a little longer than that, but not the norm. And they do typically wear at a faster rate than tires one would buy aftermarket, but that has more to do with the tire/rubber compound than any quality issues. Just compare the mileage rating one to the other (OEM vs aftermarket) and you'll see.

Vehicle dealers/manufacturers will typically provide a softer and more stable tire for new cars/truck deliveries to give a much improved ride/comfort level and a more confident road feel for the customer than a harder compound. These tires will also usually be run at a little less than optimum pressures, and both these reasons will promote what seems to be a faster than normal tire wear after the sale of a new vehicle.

Another issue that sometimes/often takes part in tire wear, especially on trucks, is that when we replace the dealer's tires with new aftermarket ones, we sometimes go up a size or two for looks and/or utility while not realizing how much just a little different size will affect longevity. For example, if you go from a 34" dia tire to a 35" dia tire (just 1" in dia difference or 1/2" taller to the axle), you will improve the wear/mileage of that tire over the smaller one by about 3%. So, if you're getting 35K miles from the bigger tire, that's an increase of approximately 1050 miles over the mileage of smaller one just from the size difference with every other thing being equal. But know this .... the vehicle manufacturer will almost always be 'on the money' with recommended tire size for optimum results. He knows his vehicle's limitations and/or requirements best.

The larger tire will often also call for a few pounds more in tire pressure too which will also provide a longer life, all other things being equal. But the single biggest increase in actual mileage of aftermarket tires over OEM's is the fact they will typically be a harder/firmer compound having a higher mileage (and sometimes load and speed) rating than OEM's, and often run those little higher pressures. At the same time you may/may not affect your actual mileage (good or bad), and you will be adding extra wear and tear to all your truck's drive train (especially gear ratio), suspension system, steering system, and braking systems. With only minor tire size differences it usually won't be enough to notice, but there will be a difference! It's those ever present, sometimes PIA laws of physics.

And lastly, there's no way a new car/truck manufacturer can tell you, the prospective buyer/owner, what the optimum tire pressure will be for 'your' particular needs. They will give a routine, average pressure requirement that will provide the best of mileage, comfort, longevity, and road feel to the most average drivers of that particular kind/type of vehicle. They cannot possibility know how anyone will/might use that vehicle after it's bought.

So, the thing to do is once you've settled on and mounted the aftermarket type and size of tire you want, or to extend the life of the OEM's, go to that tire manufacturer's web site and take a look at their tire use/pressure comparison charts. Find your tire model, use and size (and any other particulars), compare that info to their chart and see what the manufacturer's recommended tire pressure for your specific use/needs is. Rarely will it be the maximum pressure molded into the sidewall, but could be. You will also be able to determine if/and by how much you may be overloading/overworking your new tires. You'll need an actual vehicle weight (not the book weight, but ideally actual individual corner weights) with big, heavy, across the bed tool boxes, typical loads you might carry, or pulling too heavy trailers, etc. Obviously some of this isn't really necessary on most of our personal vehicles, but the bigger/heavier the vehicle is, the more important it is. And the bottom line is this ..... running tires underinflated is BY FAR......... by far ...... did I say 'by far' the single biggest contributor to premature tire wear/failure of almost any means.

Tires are a really interesting item to understand, especially for their simplicity. Take a look and you'll see. (y)(y)
Also the larger tire will stay cooler due from less contact and more air flow.
 

TEXASforLIFE

Hellcat
These tires were inflated to 35psi as it stated on the door jamb, the tires were also the right size also stated on the door jamb, as I stated I still should have got more then 6 months and a little over 4,000 miles on new damn tires, they should have not started dry rotting and cracking on the side walls like they did, done bitching on the tires, but I did replace them with 4 Hercules tires at a cost of $800.00 no thanks to Chrysler or Firestone or my dealer.
No! No! No n door jamb info! Do not go by that at all! Ford proved it too be dangerous and blamed Firestone. Go off of tire info and work towards tire wear best for that vehicle. Ford posted almost 20osi less than max psi. On a 44psi max on most newer vehicles 35 to 40 is best. With BFG E1 range (8 or 10ply) at max of 80psi 50 to 60psi gives me better tire wear on a 3/4hd. I've bought those tires for the last 37 years. 1/2 ton I do D1 (65osi) and 50psi worked best.
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
Undoubtedly if you have the correct info based on your particular use/need, the tire manufacturer charts is by far your best best and the only accurate info for that tire. Your truck may or may not ride quite as smooth or soft as the manufacturer's recommendations, but your tires will wear much better.

Like T4L says. the door jam info, even the owner's manual info is for giving you the cushy ride. Has little or nothing to do with longevity of the rubber on the road.

Edit: Believe it or not, incorrect tire inflation pressures provided by the manufacturer was one of the final 'downfalls' of the old GM Corvairs. The earlier models all had a 'Swing Arm' rear suspension, which in and of itself leaves something to be desired in performance suspensions. But then GM's tire pressure recommendations were so soft that when/if the driver got on it any at all in a corner, the swing arm would fold down and the tire would sometimes roll off the wheel and deflate causing the rim to dig in resulting in a roll over.

Corvairs got such a bad rep for rolling over that it made it easy for ol' Ralph Nader to jump on them and kill them. When in fact that could likely have been prevented if only owners would have kept up on tire pressures a little more. I owned several Corvairs over some years and never came close to rolling one...... but then I stayed on top of my vehicles and kept them up like they should have been. In fact, my very first airboat (circa: 1970-71) was home built with a 140HP Corvair engine for power. Then some years later I turned one of my old Corvairs into a "Fascar" sanctioned 'Limited Late model' stock car and toured it for a couple years. IIRC, a '62-3 2 door coupe. Ah, the good ol' days !!!!!!!! :D:D:D(y)(y)(y)
 
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jumpinjoe

Professional
Most of the time you can use the door jamb numbers as an absolute minimum pressure, but that's all they're good for usually. Those who like the really cushy, soft ride like the softer compound tires and lower pressures, and some high performance drivers/vehicles like the softer compounds for the handling/grip.

But neither of those groups typically care much about tire wear!!! :)(y)(y)(y)
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
A slight correction to my post #44 above ............ while it's true I did build a 1962-3 Corvair into a "Fascar" limited late model stock car, it was not with using the Corvair engine/drive train. If I left it to appear that way I apologize.

It was only the Corvair body that was used for the race car. It was mounted atop a 1964 Impala 'X' frame with basically a 283/302 small block V8. In fact the engine was almost a home built Z28 302 available in 1968-9. It wasn't an exact Z28 302 since there were some race class specs that had to be conformed to ...... but it was real close. The little car did a pretty good job too as long as it lasted.

As an aside, in my opinion the Corvair made one of the best looking stock cars of that period. I always liked the looks of the home built cars, especially the 'Sportsman' and 'Modified' divisions from back in the day. But my real favorites were the old 32-34-36-early 40's Coupes my dad raced back in his day.

If you're an 'old school' stock car fan, do a Google search for "oval track Corvair stock cars". Or "Old oval track stock cars from the 40's". I think you'll like it. Those Corvair 'modifieds' are just too tough looking.
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
I was informed about this issue of a ford owner in the same town I live in.


https://www.motorbiscuit.com/what-you-should-know-about-the-ford-super-duty-death-wobble/

FORD! Step up! Honor the warranty!
Gentlemen, may I offer a solution?
Photo on 10-21-21 at 6.09 PM #2.jpg
 

BobM

Ronin
A slight correction to my post #44 above ............ while it's true I did build a 1962-3 Corvair into a "Fascar" limited late model stock car, it was not with using the Corvair engine/drive train. If I left it to appear that way I apologize.

It was only the Corvair body that was used for the race car. It was mounted atop a 1964 Impala 'X' frame with basically a 283/302 small block V8. In fact the engine was almost a home built Z28 302 available in 1968-9. It wasn't an exact Z28 302 since there were some race class specs that had to be conformed to ...... but it was real close. The little car did a pretty good job too as long as it lasted.

As an aside, in my opinion the Corvair made one of the best looking stock cars of that period. I always liked the looks of the home built cars, especially the 'Sportsman' and 'Modified' divisions from back in the day. But my real favorites were the old 32-34-36-early 40's Coupes my dad raced back in his day.

If you're an 'old school' stock car fan, do a Google search for "oval track Corvair stock cars". Or "Old oval track stock cars from the 40's". I think you'll like it. Those Corvair 'modifieds' are just too tough looking.

Loved the old Corvairs. Good litle cars, trucks and vans in their day.

There's a good Jay Leno video that explains his version of the story and one Corvair.

 

jumpinjoe

Professional
Yeh, I really liked them too. Somehow it happened that I had a couple of Coupe 4 spds and 1 Van. Drove the heck out of both cars but never put the Van on the road. It didn't need much, but I was really busy about that time and also was already driving a Chevy front engine SWB custom van. I really regret not ever getting it on the road 'cause that would've been a real hoot even back then. Today that thing would be worth almost gold!
 

BobM

Ronin
Yeh, I really liked them too. Somehow it happened that I had a couple of Coupe 4 spds and 1 Van. Drove the heck out of both cars but never put the Van on the road. It didn't need much, but I was really busy about that time and also was already driving a Chevy front engine SWB custom van. I really regret not ever getting it on the road 'cause that would've been a real hoot even back then. Today that thing would be worth almost gold!
The Corvair vans were nice. Drove, rode like Cadillacs. Comfortable bench seat in the front, wing vents, independent suspension, roll down windows in the rear. The bump in the rump from the engine cowling added extra interest when loading or unloading though. And, didn't hydroplane like some of the cars did.
 

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
Gentlemen, may I offer a solution?View attachment 21485
That truck has as many issues as Ford.

Lets face it, Not a Truck made today that doesnt have issues. Modern thinking and tech lead to lots of problems. Push boundaries of output and stuff breaks.
Chevy, Ford, Dodge, Nissan, Toyota, etc … they all are prone

Every time a dealer shows me the new tech and gadgets, i respond “ more sh!t to break” !!!
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
That truck has as many issues as Ford.

Lets face it, Not a Truck made today that doesnt have issues. Modern thinking and tech lead to lots of problems. Push boundaries of output and stuff breaks.
Chevy, Ford, Dodge, Nissan, Toyota, etc … they all are prone

Every time a dealer shows me the new tech and gadgets, i respond “ more sh!t to break” !!!
Yep, techy advances offer more opportunity for issues. None on mine yet. Don't think she'll ever wobble though.
 

javbike

Custom
That truck has as many issues as Ford.

Lets face it, Not a Truck made today that doesnt have issues. Modern thinking and tech lead to lots of problems. Push boundaries of output and stuff breaks.
Chevy, Ford, Dodge, Nissan, Toyota, etc … they all are prone

Every time a dealer shows me the new tech and gadgets, i respond “ more sh!t to break” !!!
So true I glad my 2001 Ford has manual roll up widow no power nothing less to go wrong
 

BobM

Ronin
That truck has as many issues as Ford.

Lets face it, Not a Truck made today that doesnt have issues. Modern thinking and tech lead to lots of problems. Push boundaries of output and stuff breaks.
Chevy, Ford, Dodge, Nissan, Toyota, etc … they all are prone

Every time a dealer shows me the new tech and gadgets, i respond “ more sh!t to break” !!!

My thoughts as well, was just maybe holding tongue a bit longer is all?
The way some vehicles are manufactured, a person has little to no choice in what's what. Even try ordering a plain Jane truck from the factory? Get this and you have to get that too. I despise touch screen electronics from experience. Voice activated is worse for me. Just more to fail more often. They may be cool to have but not to use in my opinion. Older style buttons, knobs and switches don't even need to see to use, I went by feel or touch.

The 1st touch screen voice activated type truck had was also the last one. Now, would rather drive older used vehicles with a radio that actually turns off instead of muting than drive newer trucks or vehicles with always on "fluff and stuff." To me, newer isn't always better.
 

BobM

Ronin
Maybe.
Know lots of folks who are meticulous with their vehicle care/maintenance and the poor materials from the manufacturer(s) give out way to soon.

Am thinking some of the cheaper thinner quality and shoddier mfg. materials started because of unrealistic government expectations and interventions of and for better fuel economy and emission standards into vehicle manufacturing before manufacturers were ready to implement them.

Then in order to increase economy, manufacturers reduced weight in almost any way they could to conserve fuel and partially reduce emissions. Then, after that, somewhere along the line, planned obsolescence, where purposeful lower quality likely took over? For example: Looked at a brand new GMC truck, the driveshaft was already rusty and it hadn't even left the dealerships lot. Not a lick of OEM paint on the driveshaft.
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
For the most part, cheap(er) (in any product) is the preference for most consumers so that is what is delivered.
People can not/do not distinguish value from price.

If I purchase a pair of boots from Walmart (the definition of cheap) for $30 and wear them for eight months then replace them with a $120 pair from Redwing that I have not worn out in four years, which is the better value??
 

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
For the most part, cheap(er) (in any product) is the preference for most consumers so that is what is delivered.
People can not/do not distinguish value from price.

If I purchase a pair of boots from Walmart (the definition of cheap) for $30 and wear them for eight months then replace them with a $120 pair from Redwing that I have not worn out in four years, which is the better value??
Well, most cars today are the $30 wal mart boots
Replace and move on after a smaller number of years.
 
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