testtest

How to Use a Field Shotgun For Home Defense

Talyn

Ronin
Founding Member
The shotgun is an outstanding tool to protect yourself and your family. There’s lots of information out there about fancy tactical shotguns and their use, including specialized training and accessories. It can be a bit intimidating, but the truth is that even a simple, no-frills shotgun will help you protect your home with straightforward efficiency.


pumpsss.jpg
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
Informative article.

Whichever combination of gauge/barrel length/choke/ammo you decide on, one critical test is to pattern that combination by firing at varying distances onto an eight by eight (or larger) piece of cardboard. When I first entered three gun competition and became aware of how easy it is to miss with a shotgun, this exercise was most valuable.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
This guy lost me in a few places, the least of which isn't when he suggested using birdshot because it's less likely to go through walls.

Plenty of people use field guns for HD weapons and have forever. I, fortunately, am not one of them. Why you ask? Because I have several shotguns designed specifically for "Tactical"/home-self defense use. I don't particularly feel comfortable running buckshot or slugs through some of my older, more classic wingshooters. Although I guess to be fair I did used to load up shells with a stack of dimes just for kicks, though it's not like I fired them through any of my double barrels or guns I really cared about. :)
 

Snake45

Operator
He seems to have missed the most obvious tip: If your "field" shotgun has a removable barrel, (Rem 870/100, Mossberg 500, Ithaca 37, many, many others), look around and buy the cheapest extra barrel you can find regardless of choke. Hacksaw it off to 18.5"-20", clean up the muzzle with a fine-cut file, and have your local gunsmith install a big brass bead or, better yet, a tritium front sight. Instant "tactical" shotgun for as little as $25-150 (depending on what your barrel costs you) and no new 4473 on file for you.

Takeoff barrels can be found, sometimes amazingly cheaply, at local gun shops, gun shows, and even eBay.

Variation: Maybe your current field shotgun has a plain barrel and you've always wanted a vent rib. Take the plunge, buy a nice vent rib barrel of your choice (this will be a little more expensive), and then chop your current plain barrel for social work.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
He seems to have missed the most obvious tip: If your "field" shotgun has a removable barrel, (Rem 870/100, Mossberg 500, Ithaca 37, many, many others), look around and buy the cheapest extra barrel you can find regardless of choke. Hacksaw it off to 18.5"-20", clean up the muzzle with a fine-cut file, and have your local gunsmith install a big brass bead or, better yet, a tritium front sight. Instant "tactical" shotgun for as little as $25-150 (depending on what your barrel costs you) and no new 4473 on file for you.

Takeoff barrels can be found, sometimes amazingly cheaply, at local gun shops, gun shows, and even eBay.

Variation: Maybe your current field shotgun has a plain barrel and you've always wanted a vent rib. Take the plunge, buy a nice vent rib barrel of your choice (this will be a little more expensive), and then chop your current plain barrel for social work.
You can buy 18.5" Mossberg barrels with a bead already on it cheap, all day long.
 

Sld1959

Custom
Decent article overall, a couple things like Bob mentioned they kind of lost me on.

My shotgun for everything is a Mossberg 500 with 20 in accuchoked barrel equipped with fiber optic rifle sights. For a stock I use a traditionally styled Blackhawk Compstock, my wife and I both have arthritis and this is a nice comfort. I use it for everything from HD, to turkey and partridge hunting and I seldom do not fill my freezer.

I grew up using a rifle sighted Savage over and under for wingshooting and it comes natural for me.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
Decent article overall, a couple things like Bob mentioned they kind of lost me on.

My shotgun for everything is a Mossberg 500 with 20 in accuchoked barrel equipped with fiber optic rifle sights. For a stock I use a traditionally styled Blackhawk Compstock, my wife and I both have arthritis and this is a nice comfort. I use it for everything from HD, to turkey and partridge hunting and I seldom do not fill my freezer.

I grew up using a rifle sighted Savage over and under for wingshooting and it comes natural for me.
If I could only have one shotgun to cover all my shotgun needs it would be a Mossberg. It’s very modular, for lack of a better term. Couple barrels, couple stocks, got it all covered.
 
Good information in the article. I have often been asked what I thought the best home defense handgun is. My default answer is "shotgun", unless you intend to carry it around with you outside the home.

I shoot a lot of skeet, with a O/U gun, so I also hunt birds with an O/U. Although I have a tricked out Model 870 as my house gun (because I am a gun guy), I would not feel under gunned with a field gun for home defense. After all, the maximum range inside a room in the average American home is going to be 25 feet or less, and even bird shot will get the job done at those distances.

We did a lot of SWAT training with shotguns, and there was a trend to go buy short, pistol grip shotguns for maneuverability. But we learned in practical training that we could manage a standard riot gun in close quarters and get much better accuracy control with the full stocked guns. The few fold up guns we had were eventually relegated to breaching duty

People have been defending their homes and families with their game getters for as long as there have been firearms.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
Good information in the article. I have often been asked what I thought the best home defense handgun is. My default answer is "shotgun", unless you intend to carry it around with you outside the home.

I shoot a lot of skeet, with a O/U gun, so I also hunt birds with an O/U. Although I have a tricked out Model 870 as my house gun (because I am a gun guy), I would not feel under gunned with a field gun for home defense. After all, the maximum range inside a room in the average American home is going to be 25 feet or less, and even bird shot will get the job done at those distances.

We did a lot of SWAT training with shotguns, and there was a trend to go buy short, pistol grip shotguns for maneuverability. But we learned in practical training that we could manage a standard riot gun in close quarters and get much better accuracy control with the full stocked guns. The few fold up guns we had were eventually relegated to breaching duty

People have been defending their homes and families with their game getters for as long as there have been firearms.
Not just more accurate but also much faster on follow up shots. I used to be a pistol grip pump fan. Trained with one for years. My opinion these days is that even as a breaching tool there is no real advantage. The only advantage is concealability. Which is a moot point for my purposes.
 

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
As I read the article, with bird shot, Dick Cheney came to mind.
I’ll stick with Turkey loads or steel for ducks if I don't have buckshot.
 
Top