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The Best Hearing Protection for 2021

BobM

Hellcat
A very good longer indepth article about current hearing protection devices. Has good descriptions, pic's, selection, possible place of purchase and variety. Also lists some helpful care instructions pro's, con's and tips.

 

TSiWRX

Professional
There's some technical details that are incorrect/misleading, but overall, it's a reasonable introduction.

For example, it's not "battery acid" that leaks from an alkaline battery: it's literally the "alkaline," potassium hydroxide, which while caustic, is actually the opposite of an acid - it's an alkali. This is also why an acidic solution such as Coca Cola or lemon juice is used to facilitate cleaning of the terminals in the battery-box of a device in which such a leak has occurred.

Modern battery technology in the manner of lithium primaries such as the Energizer Ultimate Lithium have made alkali leakage a non-issue, allowing long-term storage in a "ready-to-go" manner. These batteries are now readily available in virtually any big-box store or discounter as both AA and AAA, and have been highly rated by independent sources, including the Project Farm YouTube Channel.

Similarly, their suggestion that a "liquid" (gel)-filled earcup seal may offer more noise-reduction than foam cannot be taken at face value. Depending on the specific make/model, either the foam or the gel earcup seal may offer more or less objective noise-reduction, with the latter often a concession towards comfort.

The other strangeness I found was the page's exclusive links to Amazon - leading me to believe that the author(s) receive affiliate monetization. This could potentially explain why some of the most highly regarded earpros have not made it onto this list (while others, confusingly enough, are). An additional complication here is that the article's focus is on workplace safety rather than being specifically aimed at the shooting sports.

Towards this last, in terms of the shooting sports, it should be noted that it's not all about NRR - the Noise Reduction Rating.

Because of the fact that we should/must wear eye protection, the fit of the earpro around the temples/earpieces of the chosen eye-protection can make for noted differences in earpro performance, and should be a point of comparison when shooters are shopping for not just one - but both.

Additionally, for our use in shooting sports, the specific frequency range in which the earpros offer its protection is crucially important as well. The following article regarding the "NRR 18" of the popular MSR Sordin electronic earmuffs illustrates this consideration: https://trevoronthetrigger.wordpres...me-performance-the-misleading-nrr18db-rating/

Finally, in terms of the shooting sports, for electronic ear protection (both over-the-ears as well as in-the-ears) it's less about noise-cancelling than it is about either 'compressing" or "clipping" the harmful impulses. This is discussed more in-depth in an older thread here on TAL Forums: https://www.thearmorylife.com/forum/threads/electronic-muffs.885/
 

Annihilator

SAINT
Founding Member
1635561170221.jpeg
 

BobM

Hellcat
There's some technical details that are incorrect/misleading, but overall, it's a reasonable introduction.

For example, it's not "battery acid" that leaks from an alkaline battery: it's literally the "alkaline," potassium hydroxide, which while caustic, is actually the opposite of an acid - it's an alkali. This is also why an acidic solution such as Coca Cola or lemon juice is used to facilitate cleaning of the terminals in the battery-box of a device in which such a leak has occurred.

Modern battery technology in the manner of lithium primaries such as the Energizer Ultimate Lithium have made alkali leakage a non-issue, allowing long-term storage in a "ready-to-go" manner. These batteries are now readily available in virtually any big-box store or discounter as both AA and AAA, and have been highly rated by independent sources, including the Project Farm YouTube Channel.

Similarly, their suggestion that a "liquid" (gel)-filled earcup seal may offer more noise-reduction than foam cannot be taken at face value. Depending on the specific make/model, either the foam or the gel earcup seal may offer more or less objective noise-reduction, with the latter often a concession towards comfort.

The other strangeness I found was the page's exclusive links to Amazon - leading me to believe that the author(s) receive affiliate monetization. This could potentially explain why some of the most highly regarded earpros have not made it onto this list (while others, confusingly enough, are). An additional complication here is that the article's focus is on workplace safety rather than being specifically aimed at the shooting sports.

Towards this last, in terms of the shooting sports, it should be noted that it's not all about NRR - the Noise Reduction Rating.

Because of the fact that we should/must wear eye protection, the fit of the earpro around the temples/earpieces of the chosen eye-protection can make for noted differences in earpro performance, and should be a point of comparison when shooters are shopping for not just one - but both.

Additionally, for our use in shooting sports, the specific frequency range in which the earpros offer its protection is crucially important as well. The following article regarding the "NRR 18" of the popular MSR Sordin electronic earmuffs illustrates this consideration: https://trevoronthetrigger.wordpres...me-performance-the-misleading-nrr18db-rating/

Finally, in terms of the shooting sports, for electronic ear protection (both over-the-ears as well as in-the-ears) it's less about noise-cancelling than it is about either 'compressing" or "clipping" the harmful impulses. This is discussed more in-depth in an older thread here on TAL Forums: https://www.thearmorylife.com/forum/threads/electronic-muffs.885/

Very good points to consider too.

Basically, this article is just a very good selection of hearing protection options to consider and their differences.

On possible battery leakage or precautions? A corrosive is still a corrosive to be aware of? How to treat cleaning or what to use for cleaning is good to know that there are differences to consider? Reasons for battery removal, if something uses batteries, are essentially and usually the same as far as battery removal while in long term storage, battery removal is good practice to do regardless of leakage because it deactivates the electrical system and usually prolongs battery life. Good, safe battery storage in the meantime can be as simple as a zippered plastic bag, small compartmental plastic storage box or plastic fishing tackle box if have large amounts of batteries.

IMO, reviews only generally give a person a "taste" of the product in describing them and their features. This article does that because it points out the differences and what to look for and be aware of. There are likely some better or different devices out there as you pointed out, other likely may point out more and likely some worse hearing protection devices out there too that author may not be aware of or couldn't accurately review for one reason or another?

Just reviews? Haven't really ever only relied solely on reviews, especially just one prior to any purchase. But, some others may? From experience, reviews are generally biased of one thing or another, like the authors general views, use or experience and because it may fill a particular need including which sponsors may cover the authors costs better? On which sponsor, it doesn't usually mean in order to purchase something a person has to use or choose that articles sponsor either. Don't like that sponsor for example, go elsewhere to purchase, I have and likely will in the future too?

Highest available and effective dB rating is usually the most important choice for hearing protection. On which device is better? Who knows, the higher or lower priced spread likely doesn't work for everyone or work into their plans or budgets at times? Like for someone who wants or likes music options or not? Specific needs may come to mind and are sometimes very helpful, like cutting out loud and damaging noises while allowing normal conversation and noise to pass through? Regardless, a good spread/selection of hearing protection with different available options and choices is helpful to know about. The authors article has listed those choices very well, just doesn't list every single one manufactured is all. For example, the 37dB rating on the 1st of authors choices is still a very good dB rating for what it is. Same with simple disposable ear plugs at usual lower dB ratings? Some people use both at the same time too. They are what they are and have a good useful purpose.
 

cico7

Custom
Good article and hearing protection is important.

Everything goes to Amazon. Not horrible who wants to read about something you can't find.

I read the worse reviews again many of them didn't match the products. The product varied from model number to type of ear ****
 

TSiWRX

Professional
On possible battery leakage or precautions? A corrosive is still a corrosive to be aware of? How to treat cleaning or what to use for cleaning is good to know that there are differences to consider? Reasons for battery removal, if something uses batteries, are essentially and usually the same as far as battery removal while in long term storage, battery removal is good practice to do regardless of leakage because it deactivates the electrical system and usually prolongs battery life. Good, safe battery storage in the meantime can be as simple as a zippered plastic bag, small compartmental plastic storage box or plastic fishing tackle box if have large amounts of batteries.

Absolutely, but modern battery technology has all but eliminated this worry where it comes to the battery itself (problems inherent to the device are of-course excepted, be it either by design or due to production defects), and allows "hot storage" and proper staging of items necessary for emergency-use (or just frequent-use) purposes.

Certainly, one could debate the practicality of staging earpro , but for those who frequent the range or who do stage earpro for home-defense purposes (whether it's integrated into a ballistic helmet or standalone), this does make a difference.

[ And I know that this is subjective, but for anything technical, if the author has made one mistake - particularly a glaring one - it always makes me worry what other mistakes there may be. :p Even kids these days knows that "alkali leakage" is not "battery acid." Corrosive, yes, but for the management of any potential injuries or the repair of affected components, this requires proper knowledge. ]

On which sponsor, it doesn't usually mean in order to purchase something a person has to use or choose that articles sponsor either. Don't like that sponsor for example, go elsewhere to purchase, I have and likely will in the future too?

Agreed, but again, it's worth pointing out for those who are reading, as why it was not acknowledged by the author is certainly a head-scratcher. Everyone deserves to make a living, and I think that having a side-gig that pays by using affiliate links is as legitimate as any other. But honest (not suggesting that this author is not) reviewers these days - be it in blog form or video such as YouTube - take pains to point this out, specifically for fear of seeming impropriety. Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training is one notable example of the former, and there are many of the latter, including the well-liked hickok45 .

Highest available and effective dB rating is usually the most important choice for hearing protection. On which device is better? Who knows, the higher or lower priced spread likely doesn't work for everyone or work into their plans or budgets at times? Like for someone who wants or likes music options or not? Specific needs may come to mind and are sometimes very helpful, like cutting out loud and damaging noises while allowing normal conversation and noise to pass through? Regardless, a good spread/selection of hearing protection with different available options and choices is helpful to know about. The authors article has listed those choices very well, just doesn't list every single one manufactured is all. For example, the 37dB rating on the 1st of authors choices is still a very good dB rating for what it is. Same with simple disposable ear plugs at usual lower dB ratings? Some people use both at the same time too. They are what they are and have a good useful purpose.

Again, absolutely correct, but specific to the shooting sports and our need for concomitant use of eyepro, shooters need to understand that just grabbing a pair of muffs off the shelf as based on its advertised NRR may not truly give them the protection they need.

That this review is not specifically targeted (I can't seem to get away from these words! not a pun, I promise! 😅 ) towards shooters is probably the reason why the author did not deep-dive into this concern - so he/she is certainly not wrong for doing so - but it is nevertheless something that the reader, particularly if they are a beginner in this sport/hobby and may be reading this review to gain a basic understanding - needs to keep in-mind.

And here, that the author makes a technical mistake of associating perceived earcup comfort with gel ("liquid," as it is described in the article)-filled padding with increased noise-reduction capabilities is very concerning, as in many cases, this is objectively not true.

Overall, I'm not suggesting that this review is bad - as I started with my first reply above, I think that it's a very reasonable introduction. Rather, I simply think that it's worth pointing out where it errs in terms of the technical, as well as where it falls short in terms of applicability to our specific needs.
 

Annihilator

SAINT
Founding Member
Absolutely, but modern battery technology has all but eliminated this worry where it comes to the battery itself (problems inherent to the device are of-course excepted, be it either by design or due to production defects), and allows "hot storage" and proper staging of items necessary for emergency-use (or just frequent-use) purposes.

Certainly, one could debate the practicality of staging earpro , but for those who frequent the range or who do stage earpro for home-defense purposes (whether it's integrated into a ballistic helmet or standalone), this does make a difference.

[ And I know that this is subjective, but for anything technical, if the author has made one mistake - particularly a glaring one - it always makes me worry what other mistakes there may be. :p Even kids these days knows that "alkali leakage" is not "battery acid." Corrosive, yes, but for the management of any potential injuries or the repair of affected components, this requires proper knowledge. ]



Agreed, but again, it's worth pointing out for those who are reading, as why it was not acknowledged by the author is certainly a head-scratcher. Everyone deserves to make a living, and I think that having a side-gig that pays by using affiliate links is as legitimate as any other. But honest (not suggesting that this author is not) reviewers these days - be it in blog form or video such as YouTube - take pains to point this out, specifically for fear of seeming impropriety. Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training is one notable example of the former, and there are many of the latter, including the well-liked hickok45 .



Again, absolutely correct, but specific to the shooting sports and our need for concomitant use of eyepro, shooters need to understand that just grabbing a pair of muffs off the shelf as based on its advertised NRR may not truly give them the protection they need.

That this review is not specifically targeted (I can't seem to get away from these words! not a pun, I promise! 😅 ) towards shooters is probably the reason why the author did not deep-dive into this concern - so he/she is certainly not wrong for doing so - but it is nevertheless something that the reader, particularly if they are a beginner in this sport/hobby and may be reading this review to gain a basic understanding - needs to keep in-mind.

And here, that the author makes a technical mistake of associating perceived earcup comfort with gel ("liquid," as it is described in the article)-filled padding with increased noise-reduction capabilities is very concerning, as in many cases, this is objectively not true.

Overall, I'm not suggesting that this review is bad - as I started with my first reply above, I think that it's a very reasonable introduction. Rather, I simply think that it's worth pointing out where it errs in terms of the technical, as well as where it falls short in terms of applicability to our specific needs.
Unless your use Duracell batteries, I had several items destroyed by these batteries leaking about a year ago, Comcast remote, my wife’s calculator, beard trimmer. All the batteries were new, with a good date on them, the batteries were only in these devices a short time and Duracell did nothing about it unless I had receipts, who keeps receipts that long, anyway, I definitely do not use Duracell anymore and after this incident, I am very leary on anything with batteries stored in them for a long period of time.
 

BobM

Hellcat
Absolutely, but modern battery technology has all but eliminated this worry where it comes to the battery itself (problems inherent to the device are of-course excepted, be it either by design or due to production defects), and allows "hot storage" and proper staging of items necessary for emergency-use (or just frequent-use) purposes.

Certainly, one could debate the practicality of staging earpro , but for those who frequent the range or who do stage earpro for home-defense purposes (whether it's integrated into a ballistic helmet or standalone), this does make a difference.

[ And I know that this is subjective, but for anything technical, if the author has made one mistake - particularly a glaring one - it always makes me worry what other mistakes there may be. :p Even kids these days knows that "alkali leakage" is not "battery acid." Corrosive, yes, but for the management of any potential injuries or the repair of affected components, this requires proper knowledge. ]



Agreed, but again, it's worth pointing out for those who are reading, as why it was not acknowledged by the author is certainly a head-scratcher. Everyone deserves to make a living, and I think that having a side-gig that pays by using affiliate links is as legitimate as any other. But honest (not suggesting that this author is not) reviewers these days - be it in blog form or video such as YouTube - take pains to point this out, specifically for fear of seeming impropriety. Greg Ellifritz of Active Response Training is one notable example of the former, and there are many of the latter, including the well-liked hickok45 .



Again, absolutely correct, but specific to the shooting sports and our need for concomitant use of eyepro, shooters need to understand that just grabbing a pair of muffs off the shelf as based on its advertised NRR may not truly give them the protection they need.

That this review is not specifically targeted (I can't seem to get away from these words! not a pun, I promise! 😅 ) towards shooters is probably the reason why the author did not deep-dive into this concern - so he/she is certainly not wrong for doing so - but it is nevertheless something that the reader, particularly if they are a beginner in this sport/hobby and may be reading this review to gain a basic understanding - needs to keep in-mind.

And here, that the author makes a technical mistake of associating perceived earcup comfort with gel ("liquid," as it is described in the article)-filled padding with increased noise-reduction capabilities is very concerning, as in many cases, this is objectively not true.

Overall, I'm not suggesting that this review is bad - as I started with my first reply above, I think that it's a very reasonable introduction. Rather, I simply think that it's worth pointing out where it errs in terms of the technical, as well as where it falls short in terms of applicability to our specific needs.

Likely many reasons for technical differences with much that was mentioned? Mostly basics of what known by author or who at the time and where what's available where too? It all can change from place to place like the weather in different locations from my experience. We all live on the same planet, but the weather's not always the same in every place at the same time for example?

Times, in how things are done, people and methods change from time to time may be some of it? Some better, some not? Sometimes, like clothing fads, they often repeat themselves as well? Someone who has the biggest, newest, quickest game in town, sometimes forgets older tech still exists, functions and is enjoyable too?

It generally pays to keep up to degree with all the new tech, but also remembering the old ways and things so that some good may be kept while lesser quality's pushed further behind? With older tech and things being swept away by faster newer tech's whatever's so quickly, much is lost and sometimes gained? Good or not, guessing some of it may be in what whoever's caught up in with what at the moment too?

Sometimes, people and things get caught up in technical details too much where the enjoyment or the purpose and satisfaction may be lost too? What's actually gained or lost from what then? There's some reasoning in there someplace? Used to be, new tech was released to the public about every 10 years or so, so as not to ruffle feathers of many people and older tech too much because it may stress people out too much. Now, some release dates may be like what, 10 months? Some can see and feel the effects, stress and mistakes with or for people more clearly now because of newer techs currently and constantly evolving too rapidly at times? The authors, yours and my combined comments may reflect that point in the details?


Sponsors, advertisers may be in another world at times? Even with simple things like introductions for example? How many times has a newer product, TV show, movie or article stated "Brought to you by" this sponsor or that one? Age may show in that question? Either in the beginning or end of whatever lately? - There was talk in the movie industry to forgo mentioning the advertising and credits at one time, um, that didn't float too well did it? Why? Many things are done more quickly now days, sometimes things maybe move too quickly or possibly too much at once to benefit anyone may be some of it? The pace may be too far advanced for the audience or time to benefit many people. Basically, out of sync, off kilter? Possibly too greedy or too competitive to realize widespread effects?

Changes? Taking in for example the recent condition of covid for example? Have noticed many advertisers and sponsors were right there, right on top and upfront promoting this or that to people, consumers who are and were looking at what, empty shelving? What's to be gained and lost by that then? Timing is much to selling, promoting whatever from whichever end. If not? What are the sometimes remorseful events that can occur afterwards and to whom? It, or the end effects, results isn't always about a consumer or purchaser, it can also be to an advertiser or seller? It can be a tit for tat, caring or uncaring upside down or rightside up world sometimes?


Other specifics? Basically, one big thing to be aware of and hopefully helpful in this world is knowing about and knowing what specifics? Yes, specifics are important, but also why they are as well. Much looks the same for various reasons because of this cladding or that - while the internals may be different. Are cladding, appearance importance? Yep. Is marketing capitalizing on fads? Yep. Is another reason liked the article, it detailed that there were differences, may not have gotten all the terminology exactly correct, but did in showing the examples of differences in benefits. Am thinking most of authors audience likely gained that there were benefits and differences to each? The benefit is the part many people likely realize and use more?

The details of specifics, sometimes is like a road trip, good book or story? Getting there can be fun, sometimes best part of trip, but the goal is still the actual destination or benefit? Author basically specified there were differences that went along with whatever product - and the possible benefits. - Overlooked, lost what if anything then? - Like one of the most useful overlooked things hopefully learned in education? The actual ability to learn most anything? The subject matter may change like the wind in details with various subject matters in history or geography as time goes by, nations and peoples can come and go, but the learning ability is the basic key to the world. The specifics can change and are sometimes irrelevant while the benefits aren't? Yep, "the devil may be in the details?" - And, sometimes the specifics? Hopefully, there's a balance in there someplace? :)
 

TSiWRX

Professional
Unless your use Duracell batteries, I had several items destroyed by these batteries leaking about a year ago, Comcast remote, my wife’s calculator, beard trimmer. All the batteries were new, with a good date on them, the batteries were only in these devices a short time and Duracell did nothing about it unless I had receipts, who keeps receipts that long, anyway, I definitely do not use Duracell anymore and after this incident, I am very leary on anything with batteries stored in them for a long period of time.

^ And that's precisely what I cited as the shortcoming of that article ;) - the author focused on alkaline batteries (and mistakenly noted that it leaked "battery acid" - which is in-actuality alkali, and is neutralized/cleaned via the use of acidic solutions such as Coca Cola or lemon juice), and did not discuss the possibility of using modern lithium primaries.

For sensitive/valuable electronics or items which are staged for emergency use, either lithium primaries or modern-chemistry rechargeables are the way to go.

[ I do not believe that Duracell currently makes lithium primaries in either the AA or AAA format. But branching outside of these two formats, their CR123-format lithium primaries are still decently thought of and typically come in mid-pack in performance. Although costs can be high, they are readily available CONUS via big-box discounters, electronics retailers, or even common supermarkets and convenience stores. ]

-----

Likely many reasons for technical differences with much that was mentioned? Mostly basics of what known by author or who at the time and where what's available where too? It all can change from place to place like the weather in different locations from my experience. We all live on the same planet, but the weather's not always the same in every place at the same time for example?

Times, in how things are done, people and methods change from time to time may be some of it? Some better, some not? Sometimes, like clothing fads, they often repeat themselves as well? Someone who has the biggest, newest, quickest game in town, sometimes forgets older tech still exists, functions and is enjoyable too?

The author did title his review "best of 2021," so it is only logical to assume that technical discussions would be current.

It generally pays to keep up to degree with all the new tech, but also remembering the old ways and things so that some good may be kept while lesser quality's pushed further behind? With older tech and things being swept away by faster newer tech's whatever's so quickly, much is lost and sometimes gained? Good or not, guessing some of it may be in what whoever's caught up in with what at the moment too?

In terms of the context of the review, I don't think that the author disregarded "old school" at all. Many of the items he mentioned are of the passive type and do not use either compression/clipping technology or noise-cancelling. It did not read to me that the author only wanted to focus on cutting-edge gadgetry.

Sometimes, people and things get caught up in technical details too much where the enjoyment or the purpose and satisfaction may be lost too? What's actually gained or lost from what then? There's some reasoning in there someplace? Used to be, new tech was released to the public about every 10 years or so, so as not to ruffle feathers of many people and older tech too much because it may stress people out too much. Now, some release dates may be like what, 10 months? Some can see and feel the effects, stress and mistakes with or for people more clearly now because of newer techs currently and constantly evolving too rapidly at times? The authors, yours and my combined comments may reflect that point in the details?

I don't believe that basic technical understanding should be overlooked. The acid-base chemistry that the author mistook is, as I noted, grade-school general-knowledge.

Much like the basic-level detail of proper staking of the AR-15's "castle nut," the lack of base-level technical wherewithal erodes one's confidence in the author's ability to truly properly inform. It makes the reader ask the question: "if he got this wrong, what else might be wrong about, too?"

Sponsors, advertisers may be in another world at times? Even with simple things like introductions for example? How many times has a newer product, TV show, movie or article stated "Brought to you by" this sponsor or that one? Age may show in that question? Either in the beginning or end of whatever lately? - There was talk in the movie industry to forgo mentioning the advertising and credits at one time, um, that didn't float too well did it? Why? Many things are done more quickly now days, sometimes things maybe move too quickly or possibly too much at once to benefit anyone may be some of it? The pace may be too far advanced for the audience or time to benefit many people. Basically, out of sync, off kilter? Possibly too greedy or too competitive to realize widespread effects?

Changes? Taking in for example the recent condition of covid for example? Have noticed many advertisers and sponsors were right there, right on top and upfront promoting this or that to people, consumers who are and were looking at what, empty shelving? What's to be gained and lost by that then? Timing is much to selling, promoting whatever from whichever end. If not? What are the sometimes remorseful events that can occur afterwards and to whom? It, or the end effects, results isn't always about a consumer or purchaser, it can also be to an advertiser or seller? It can be a tit for tat, caring or uncaring upside down or rightside up world sometimes?

Good point, and I believe it's precisely to address some of these questions that many today -particularly in the firearms industry- have decided to be so declarative.

Other specifics? Basically, one big thing to be aware of and hopefully helpful in this world is knowing about and knowing what specifics? Yes, specifics are important, but also why they are as well. Much looks the same for various reasons because of this cladding or that - while the internals may be different. Are cladding, appearance importance? Yep. Is marketing capitalizing on fads? Yep. Is another reason liked the article, it detailed that there were differences, may not have gotten all the terminology exactly correct, but did in showing the examples of differences in benefits. Am thinking most of authors audience likely gained that there were benefits and differences to each? The benefit is the part many people likely realize and use more?

The details of specifics, sometimes is like a road trip, good book or story? Getting there can be fun, sometimes best part of trip, but the goal is still the actual destination or benefit? Author basically specified there were differences that went along with whatever product - and the possible benefits. - Overlooked, lost what if anything then? - Like one of the most useful overlooked things hopefully learned in education? The actual ability to learn most anything? The subject matter may change like the wind in details with various subject matters in history or geography as time goes by, nations and peoples can come and go, but the learning ability is the basic key to the world. The specifics can change and are sometimes irrelevant while the benefits aren't? Yep, "the devil may be in the details?" - And, sometimes the specifics? Hopefully, there's a balance in there someplace? :)

I don't disagree - and again I call attention to how I started my original reply: that I do believe the article is a good introduction to this essential part of our sport and hobby, which at times can be technical and complex.

But that's also precisely why technical correctness matters: an overview may by-definition be generalized, but such generalizations need not be objectively incorrect.
 
A couple of things:
  • not all items have a NRR. I thought this was an article about hearing protection.
  • no MSRP listed. I don't want to click a link to find out price. If I'm really interested, I'll search out street prices.
  • rating may depend on ability to play music? Really?
 

Pitdogg2

Custom
Unless your use Duracell batteries, I had several items destroyed by these batteries leaking about a year ago, Comcast remote, my wife’s calculator, beard trimmer. All the batteries were new, with a good date on them, the batteries were only in these devices a short time and Duracell did nothing about it unless I had receipts, who keeps receipts that long, anyway, I definitely do not use Duracell anymore and after this incident, I am very leary on anything with batteries stored in them for a long period of time.
Had that same problem. I was so farking mad at Duracell!
When I went back to the store I took pictures of brand new packs on the shelves with rotten batteries in them.
Duracell insisted there was no problems with their products. Until about 2months ago when I deleted the pictures I could have shown you. The good till dates were years ahead but these batteries were literally bulging and grayish white gunk coming through the sides.
Like you they looked brand new perfect when I put them into my remotes.
 

Susquash

Master Class
Founding Member
I have several pairs of hearing muffs. Bpuhjt a couple pairs of Caldwell electronic muffs but they did not seem to hold up well. The last two I purchased were Walker Game Ear and Walker Razor
Replaced batteries with Eveready Lithium batteries which are 100% guaranteed not to leak. They seem to do a decent job for mowing or at the range.
 

Pitdogg2

Custom
Mine are cheap Caldwell electronic muffs. MidwayUSA had them on special about 12-15 yrs ago. Best $18 plus shipping I ever spent😉.
I need to invest in new. I've looked at the Walkers at both Sams Club and Bass Pro. I'll hold out a bit longer as they are not a "need" at this time.
They've come a long way since I bought mine.
 
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