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Cover and Concealment in Home Defense

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
Someone in my house at night, I am laying down. Folks rarely look down. Especially in the dark.

Here locally, Police responded to an incident at night in an apartment. Suspect shot and killed an officer upon entry. Long ensuing gun battle broke out with suspect and other officers that were behind the fallen officer. Officers didn't see him on the floor at the end of a hallway and fired all their shots over his head . Expended all their ammo.

Took SWAT entry with shields to determine where the fire was coming from to eliminate the threat.
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
Not much in the article, but perhaps some might not have been aware there is nearly nothing that will stop a bullet from getting to you in the home.

Cover and concealment in the home could/should cover much more.

I'm guessing here, but most home invasions or illegal entry or even a perp coming thru an unlocked door/window must occur in hours of darkness. The first thing I had to teach my wife was to keep her fingers off the light switch! If you are trying to observe outside the house from inside the house, keep the house dark while lighting up the outside; the perp can not observe you or inside the house when it is dark and with light in his eyes, plus it preserves your "night vision". When I turn in for the night, after checking doors and windows, all lights are off. No "nightlights". What the h*** are those for anyway? In nearly every home, there is enough ambient light from the stove clock to the fire alarm eye to a dozen other gadgets that will allow you to find your way to the BR for those (of us with a bit of age) frequent nighttime whizzes. Just turn on an interior light and the perp will know your location, and, thru a tiny crack in the blinds/curtains, will see you. I tape over some of these pesky little forever illuminated lights such as smoke detectors. If I need light, I have one on my piece. Another night vision tactic is to look approximately thirty degrees away from what you actually want to identify instead of directly at it, in darkness the peripheral vision works better; try it, it works. On the main level bedroom where I sleep I keep a solid steel plate one half inches thick, from the knees up to above my head, with a one eighth inch "vision slot" in it, on a frame that won't tip and on tool box casters, that I can easily maneuver ahead of me thru the entire house. I continue to refine my castle against unlawful entry.
 

BobM

Hellcat
Thanks Mike, is more of a good generalized awareness article from this perspective.
Most newer homes usually offer less security, construction or durability wise unless built, modified and spec'd differently than conventional housing. Isn't really much difference between conventional doors or walls either. Out of sight or in sight is basic security. Same with silence or noise. Learning and knowing how to use those basics to an advantage is the key to a situation.
 

Ranger715

Operator
I like that the video wakes people up to the fact that most things in their home will not stop bullets. How many times have we seen heroes in movies use a table or a couch as cover from an army of machine gun wielding bad guys? Reality check, please!

A greater issue, in my view, is the frailty of most standard door construction. Almost everyone should take steps to reinforce the strength of their door frames, to prevent easy forced entry, thus giving you time to perceive the threat and prepare for defense before they get in, if they get through. If they kick through your door in one or two tries, they can be in before you know you even need your gun. Neither cover nor concealment will be much help then.
 

ScottJ

Professional
Founding Member
I like that the video wakes people up to the fact that most things in their home will not stop bullets. How many times have we seen heroes in movies use a table or a couch as cover from an army of machine gun wielding bad guys? Reality check, please!

A greater issue, in my view, is the frailty of most standard door construction. Almost everyone should take steps to reinforce the strength of their door frames, to prevent easy forced entry, thus giving you time to perceive the threat and prepare for defense before they get in, if they get through. If they kick through your door in one or two tries, they can be in before you know you even need your gun. Neither cover nor concealment will be much help then.
Replacing the manufacturer-supplied/installed short (1"?) brass wood screws in hinges, striker plates, etc, with long deck screws, is a good start.
 

SSmith

Operator
For me at my house, the quickest easier way to slow down an intruder is to keep him out. If you reinforce a door jamb is some 3/16 steel, just drill holes where the dead bolt and screws ECT go thru and you have stopped most entry. Bolt the plate to the 2x4 and get longer screws for the hinges and plates and your door will break before your jamb, which is where most breakage occurs. Stay safe!! 🤔
 
Although the article and overall purpose of what was being discussed was good the video not so much, did he really need to have a AR Style rifle slung over his body while he talked about things that unless he’s a home builder or general contractor “which I doubt” he knows very little about. He was correct about homes built before the…. I’ll say the 60’s homes were built with unfinished lumber, by definition a 2X4 measured 2X4 and if your talking a home built in the very early 1900 hundreds or older this wood is for a lack of a better term (petrified) rock hard and not usually pine or other soft woods. And then that column he fixated on, most likely not hollow especially being in the area of a stair case. He also failed to discuss the current application of what is used in large majority of newer homes and that is laminated woods and when that wood is used in support columns it can a formidable barrier because of the nature of how it’s made. Yes current/modern firearm ammunition can be devastating due to design and many homes are not built with the thought of future home invasion l feel the video missed a lot of important factors when it comes to barrier use.
My opinion.
 

BobM

Hellcat
Although the article and overall purpose of what was being discussed was good the video not so much, did he really need to have a AR Style rifle slung over his body while he talked about things that unless he’s a home builder or general contractor “which I doubt” he knows very little about. He was correct about homes built before the…. I’ll say the 60’s homes were built with unfinished lumber, by definition a 2X4 measured 2X4 and if your talking a home built in the very early 1900 hundreds or older this wood is for a lack of a better term (petrified) rock hard and not usually pine or other soft woods. And then that column he fixated on, most likely not hollow especially being in the area of a stair case. He also failed to discuss the current application of what is used in large majority of newer homes and that is laminated woods and when that wood is used in support columns it can a formidable barrier because of the nature of how it’s made. Yes current/modern firearm ammunition can be devastating due to design and many homes are not built with the thought of future home invasion l feel the video missed a lot of important factors when it comes to barrier use.
My opinion.

Very good points Keystone.
Buildings throughout the years have changed material quite a bit from thicker rough cut lumber and sheathing to laminates and plastics, not even touching on block, stone and concrete structures. Outer or inner bearing walls are different than non weight bearing walls too. The buildings may appear similar to inexperience untrained eyes, but methods and materials have changed quite a bit. For example: Harder lath and plaster were used in older homes and still some newer ones at times. Drywall or sheet rock has replaced that for the most part. Plywood replaced nominal boards and OSB has almost replaced both of those for flooring and other needs. Preformed parts and panels have also replaced more traditional methods too. Much is harder stiffer compressed wood or some other material. Just like firearms, know your home and what it's strengths and weaknesses are.
 
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