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Do you red dot, or not?

Do you use red dot sights as part of your EDC?

  • Yes

    Votes: 12 34.3%
  • No

    Votes: 12 34.3%
  • Thinking about it

    Votes: 11 31.4%

  • Total voters
    35
So if you buy a unit that's "always on" you probably replace the battery quite often?
Every manufacturer should post on the description of the unit how long the battery lasts. I know on the Hex Wasp, which is always on - made by Springfield Armory - advertise it will last 65,000 hours, the equivalent of 2 years. That's a pretty long time. Most people like to switch the battery out every year, just in case. I've had my Wasp since the day after they came out. I think it was February or March, can't remember. It's still going strong.
 

dadoser

Operator
With red dots, do you have to "turn on" the dot when you pull the pistol out?
(Most?) Holosuns say 50,000 hrs of battery life. A lot of their models also have a solar power source along with the battery; as well as an auto on/off feature. they also have the batter compartment open on the side - allowing a battery change without having to remove the dot.
 
I have a Holosun 507K on my Sig P365XL. It’s made all the difference in the world.

My eyes are getting older, so one issue it’s solved is the inability to see the front sight clearly. And the red dot is faster to acquire and get on target (especially with the 2 MOA dot inside the 32 MOA reticle that Holosun provides).

I took a training class last Sunday and spent 7 hours drilling holster draws and target acquisition and other related skills.

The class showed me how well a RDS improves accuracy and allows you to focus on the target while simultaneously sighting the target. I will never carry anything but a RDS equipped handgun.

I bought the Hellcat with the optical cut slide and will probably put another HS507K on it next week.
 

Jimbo

Elite
I have a Ruger EC9S. There is no more "plain vanilla" gun that that one. The sights are part of the slide, and the slide and the sights are all black.

My thought is that I do not want a red-dot sight on my Ruger. The reason? Simplicity. The simplicity of the gun means that there is no chance for any sight technology to fail - I have read that a red dot may take a second or two to acquire the target. Also, the battery could die. And what if an EMP were to occur? Would that fry the red-dot sight's electronics? I prefer to learn to shoot with the gun as-is, that is, simple and basic, because "simple" won't have a failure at a critical moment.

Also, there is nothing to snag on my clothing as I draw the weapon - it is smooth all over, including the sights, which are nothing more than nubs sticking out from the slide.

As for the sights being all black, a spot of paint solved that problem.
 
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David N.

Professional
Founding Member
I have a Ruger EC9S. There is no more "plain vanilla" gun that that one. The sights are part of the slide, and the slide and the sights are all black.

My thought is that I do not want a red-dot sight on my Ruger. The reason? Simplicity. The simplicity of the gun means that there is no chance for any sight technology to fail - I have read that a red dot may take a second or two to acquire the target. Also, the battery could die. And what if an EMP were to occur? Would that fry the red-dot sight's electronics? I prefer to learn to shoot with the gun as-is, that is, simple and basic, because "simple" won't have a failure at a critical moment.

Also, there is nothing to snag on my clothing as I draw the weapon - it is smooth all over, including the sights, which are nothing more than nubs sticking out from the slide.

As for the sights being all black, a spot of paint solved that problem.

This is definitely an individual choice.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
I have a Ruger EC9S. There is no more "plain vanilla" gun that that one. The sights are part of the slide, and the slide and the sights are all black.

My thought is that I do not want a red-dot sight on my Ruger. The reason? Simplicity. The simplicity of the gun means that there is no chance for any sight technology to fail - I have read that a red dot may take a second or two to acquire the target. Also, the battery could die. And what if an EMP were to occur? Would that fry the red-dot sight's electronics? I prefer to learn to shoot with the gun as-is, that is, simple and basic, because "simple" won't have a failure at a critical moment.

Also, there is nothing to snag on my clothing as I draw the weapon - it is smooth all over, including the sights, which are nothing more than nubs sticking out from the slide.

As for the sights being all black, a spot of paint solved that problem.
While I don't agree with everything you said, I feel nearly the same way. Less is often more on a carry gun.
 

tapehoser

Operator
I have a Ruger EC9S. There is no more "plain vanilla" gun that that one. The sights are part of the slide, and the slide and the sights are all black.

My thought is that I do not want a red-dot sight on my Ruger. The reason? Simplicity. The simplicity of the gun means that there is no chance for any sight technology to fail - I have read that a red dot may take a second or two to acquire the target. Also, the battery could die. And what if an EMP were to occur? Would that fry the red-dot sight's electronics? I prefer to learn to shoot with the gun as-is, that is, simple and basic, because "simple" won't have a failure at a critical moment.

Also, there is nothing to snag on my clothing as I draw the weapon - it is smooth all over, including the sights, which are nothing more than nubs sticking out from the slide.

As for the sights being all black, a spot of paint solved that problem.
Your opinion just helped push me back from the brink.

I shoot my carry weapons very well and don't want the extra training and option for failure from another piece of hardware on a simple gun that is meant to go bang when I pull it out. Thanks, Jimbo.
 

Mr. Untactical

Elite
Founding Member
I am actively exploring the option of a red dot sight as part of my EDC. I mentioned in other posts that my eyesight is failing and I can no longer see the sights clearly. This lack of clarity in my sight picture is interfering with my accuracy and is tiring during extended range sessions.

I installed a red dot sight on my Ruger Mark IV 22/45 Lite to see what this technology was all about. I headed out to my local range to zero the device. I mentioned to the range safety officer the reason for my visit, and he stated that he recently made the switch for the same reasons. He assured me that it would make a difference in my shooting experience. After my range session, I agreed.

The addition of a red dot sight improved both my sight picture and accuracy on target. Although it did take some getting used to, I was able to rapidly acquire the dot in the window after a few magazines. I discovered that my presentation was sloppy and when corrected the dot appeared in the window immediately each time without having to search for it.

A few hundred rounds in, but I am certain that I will be adding a red dot to my EDC in the future.

I am in exploration mode as well. My XDM Elite Tactical OSP has a Hex Dragonfly red dot. Although it will never be my EDC - unless I move to the sticks and all - it is a nice platform to get used to being target focused instead of front sight focused.

Just picked up a Hellcat and if performance at the range progresses well from dry fire, I will likely take the next step and get the Hex Wasp for it. By all accounts, the stock sights will co-witness with the Wasp and the optic is always on and is reported to have a ridiculously long battery life. The plan is to rotate the Hellcat to primary EDC - at least during summer months, but it has to pass all the testing, training, and firing to make the grade.

I'll post up down the road once all the pieces are in place and results are in. Holster arrives today!
 

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
I hate red dots on a pistol.
Horrible
I do not do well with them.
On my rifles, I love my red dots

another member on here I shoot with does extremely well with his red dots, even out to further distances.

its personal preference based on many factors.

if a red dot makes a shooter better and keeps them on target, have at it. More the merrier. Safety and accuracy are the keys. If the red dot solves that, kick a$$ Seabass.

For myslef , I’ll stay with them on rifles
 

tapehoser

Operator
I hate red dots on a pistol.
Horrible
I do not do well with them.
On my rifles, I love my red dots

another member on here I shoot with does extremely well with his red dots, even out to further distances.

its personal preference based on many factors.

if a red dot makes a shooter better and keeps them on target, have at it. More the merrier. Safety and accuracy are the keys. If the red dot solves that, kick a$$ Seabass.

For myslef , I’ll stay with them on rifles

Maybe I'll chuck my old TruGlo onto my Marlin 45-70 and see what happens!
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
I think the key to shooting well with a red dot is to point the gun instinctively at the target, then looking through the glass and not at the glass, see the dot out there on the target. If you can learn to do this you'll never be bothered by the irons, in fact you'll rarely even see them.

This is the way I was taught and it works well for me. Jus' somethin' to ponder y'all. YMMV!
 
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