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Driving with a Handgun: Best Practices

KillerFord1977

Ronin
Founding Member
Sitting in a car/cruiser?
Because I cannot see myself getting out of the car with a pistol in hand and then holstering it. In Walmart parking lot.
When I attach the holster with the gun inside, I feel safer. I could do it in the car seat.

Although, now, with the new holster, I got in the habit of leaving it on the belt while driving. Canted enough to go past my hip. And yes the seatbelt is a bit over it... but if I leave my t-shirt tucked behind the grip, is still reachable.
I unbelt my seatbelt and while sitting, holster my sidearm before the door ever get remotely close to opening
 

SoNic

Elite
I unbelt my seatbelt and while sitting, holster my sidearm before the door ever get remotely close to opening
You are better man than me.
I don't want any naked/unholstered, loaded gun pointing into my innards, leg arteries (deadly, see pic below), or family jewels, while sitting. Especially when fighting the body shape to get it in a holster.
That's why in the initial post I said I think this practice can lead to accidents. My opinion.

arteries_lower_limb72.jpg
 

jmcd

Professional
Founding Member
Depending on what I am carrying in the summer months, I started to notice a little wear in the seat from the butt of the gun hitting it. Luckily it was leather and it went back to it original look after a while. I really don't want to move my 4 o'clock position. Might have to get some cheapo cushion to prevent that in the summer months. Winter months aren't an issue with heavier clothing.
 

TSiWRX

Professional
^ Aesthetics aside, as long as the leather doesn't tear, should time come to sell or trade-in your vehicle, a good interior detailer can get that foam-depression and leather wrinkles/discoloration right out.

It's the same as what needs to be done for child/infant safety-seat indentations, which are routinely left in vehicles' back seats due to *_proper_* installation of those devices. :)
 

SoNic

Elite
Gun magnets.
Might be not legal in some jurisdictions. In some states the handguns in a car have to be in a holster on person or in a locked compartment.

And those car magnets don't require un-holstering and re-holstering the pistol, while sitting in the car? Not happening for me. A shot in the femoral artery is "good night".
 

Bassbob

Ronin
Might be not legal in some jurisdictions. In some states the handguns in a car have to be in a holster on person or in a locked compartment.

And those car magnets don't require un-holstering and re-holstering the pistol, while sitting in the car? Not happening for me. A shot in the femoral artery is "good night".
How would you hit your femoral artery unless you had the gun pointing at you?
They also have mounts for your holster and you mount them with the gun facing forward.
 

Jimbo

Elite
Might be not legal in some jurisdictions. In some states the handguns in a car have to be in a holster on person or in a locked compartment.

And those car magnets don't require un-holstering and re-holstering the pistol, while sitting in the car? Not happening for me. A shot in the femoral artery is "good night".
The article states: "According to Texas law, a handgun must be in a 'shoulder or belt holster.' A magnetic mount is not considered a holster. That means that leaving your handgun in a magnetic mount in your car is akin to leaving it in plain sight without a holster — a violation of Texas Law regardless of whether you have an LTC or not."

The article is two years old, even though the title says "2021". This seems to be confirmed by the fact that the author doesn't mention anything about permitless carry which will go into effect in Texas in Sept 2021, and by the fact that the author refers to "a 1967 Cobra or a lifted 2019 Ford Dually" (not a 2021 Ford Dually).

My point is, I wonder if it will be legal to use a magnetic holster in your car once permitless carry goes into effect next month?

Speaking of Texas permitless carry, I wonder how many people were planning on carrying at the NRA convention without a carry permit? I'm guessing the vast majority who didn't already have a permit would have carried, once they crossed the state line into Texas.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
The article states: "According to Texas law, a handgun must be in a 'shoulder or belt holster.' A magnetic mount is not considered a holster. That means that leaving your handgun in a magnetic mount in your car is akin to leaving it in plain sight without a holster — a violation of Texas Law regardless of whether you have an LTC or not."

The article is two years old, even though the title says "2021". This seems to be confirmed by the fact that the author doesn't mention anything about permitless carry which will go into effect in Texas in Sept 2021, and by the fact that the author refers to "a 1967 Cobra or a lifted 2019 Ford Dually" (not a 2021 Ford Dually).

My point is, I wonder if it will be legal to use a magnetic holster in your car once permitless carry goes into effect next month?

Speaking of Texas permitless carry, I wonder how many people were planning on carrying at the NRA convention without a carry permit? I'm guessing the vast majority who didn't already have a permit would have carried, once they crossed the state line into Texas.
See this is the kind of thing I’m talking about when I say I used to want to move to Texas back when Missouri had crappy gun laws, but these days Missouri gun laws make Texas look like New York.
 

KillerFord1977

Ronin
Founding Member
The article states: "According to Texas law, a handgun must be in a 'shoulder or belt holster.' A magnetic mount is not considered a holster. That means that leaving your handgun in a magnetic mount in your car is akin to leaving it in plain sight without a holster — a violation of Texas Law regardless of whether you have an LTC or not."

The article is two years old, even though the title says "2021". This seems to be confirmed by the fact that the author doesn't mention anything about permitless carry which will go into effect in Texas in Sept 2021, and by the fact that the author refers to "a 1967 Cobra or a lifted 2019 Ford Dually" (not a 2021 Ford Dually).

My point is, I wonder if it will be legal to use a magnetic holster in your car once permitless carry goes into effect next month?

Speaking of Texas permitless carry, I wonder how many people were planning on carrying at the NRA convention without a carry permit? I'm guessing the vast majority who didn't already have a permit would have carried, once they crossed the state line into Texas.
Texas has “castle law”.
An un permitted citizen may have a firearm in their vehicle to defend themselves.
Key is “defend themselves”.
Cannot use it in defense of others without a conceal permit.

leaving a gun in plain sight this day and age in a vehicle regardless of unlawful or not is just plain lack of good judgement. This isn't 1965 Texas.
 

BobM

Hellcat
The article states: "According to Texas law, a handgun must be in a 'shoulder or belt holster.' A magnetic mount is not considered a holster. That means that leaving your handgun in a magnetic mount in your car is akin to leaving it in plain sight without a holster — a violation of Texas Law regardless of whether you have an LTC or not."

The article is two years old, even though the title says "2021". This seems to be confirmed by the fact that the author doesn't mention anything about permitless carry which will go into effect in Texas in Sept 2021, and by the fact that the author refers to "a 1967 Cobra or a lifted 2019 Ford Dually" (not a 2021 Ford Dually).

My point is, I wonder if it will be legal to use a magnetic holster in your car once permitless carry goes into effect next month?

Speaking of Texas permitless carry, I wonder how many people were planning on carrying at the NRA convention without a carry permit? I'm guessing the vast majority who didn't already have a permit would have carried, once they crossed the state line into Texas.

It can get confusing on new and improved whatevers. ....holsters and magnetics included? In this day and age with so many new products arriving almost daily? Who's to say what is what, where and when it is or isn't? The following ads should help show what am trying to explain? Both look like great innovative products for intended use as described in their websites and pretty cool magnetic products besides. Both may also look like something to look into further? And, then am sure there's more and different products as well. ....But, who knows?

This 1st ad from one company states their product is a magnetic holster.
(Although it could also be considered a mount as well?)


The next ad from another company says this is a magnetic holster as well, but it looks to be clasped at the belt line and can be used w/o a belt and still holds a handgun, which may be sort of nice in some scenarios when not wearing an actual belt? Like with sweat pants?

 

Bassbob

Ronin
Texas has “castle law”.
An un permitted citizen may have a firearm in their vehicle to defend themselves.
Key is “defend themselves”.
Cannot use it in defense of others without a conceal permit.

leaving a gun in plain sight this day and age in a vehicle regardless of unlawful or not is just plain lack of good judgement. This isn't 1965 Texas.
More stupidity. How the F is it remotely logical that you can only defend your life unless you have a carry permit, then you can defend someone else ? That's asinine.

Also we aren't exactly talking about leaving a gun in plain sight. We are talking about storing a gun where it is easily accessible while you are driving. Not LEAVING the gun anywhere. And a holster or magnet up under the steering wheel or low on your dash really isn't visible. And regardless having a law that says you can have a gun in your car as long as it isn't visible is just more stupidity.
 

KillerFord1977

Ronin
Founding Member
More stupidity. How the F is it remotely logical that you can only defend your life unless you have a carry permit, then you can defend someone else ? That's asinine.

Also we aren't exactly talking about leaving a gun in plain sight. We are talking about storing a gun where it is easily accessible while you are driving. Not LEAVING the gun anywhere. And a holster or magnet up under the steering wheel or low on your dash really isn't visible. And regardless having a law that says you can have a gun in your car as long as it isn't visible is just more stupidity.
I’m just the messenger of the law on the books
 

SoNic

Elite
And a holster or magnet up under the steering wheel or low on your dash really isn't visible.
That's Texas. There, like in some other states (Florida), you can't have the gun displayed in the car.
In other states you can't "hide" a gun in the car (in reach) without a concealed carry permit, but you can have it open on the seat next to you.
The rules are confusing and can get one in trouble easy just by driving over state's borders.
Example NC: https://www.ncdps.gov/Our-Organization/Law-Enforcement/State-Highway-Patrol/FAQ/Handguns-In-Vehicles
It is unlawful to carry a concealed handgun in a vehicle unless the person has a valid concealed carry permit."​

A person who is not a convicted felon may carry a handgun if not concealed.

A handgun is concealed in a vehicle if it cannot be readily seen by a person approaching and if it is readily accessible. A handgun under the front seat or in an unlocked glove box or console is illegal. A handgun openly displayed or in a locked glove box, locked console, or in the trunk is lawful.
Virginia has a similar law, and it goes a bit further - the compartment doesn't have to be actually locked, just securedly latched.
According to Virginia law, vehicle carry of a loaded handgun is allowed in a secured compartment, or plainly visible without a permit. As of July 1, 2010, a concealed handgun permit is not necessary when carrying a handgun while in a personal, private motor vehicle and the handgun is secured in a container or compartment in the vehicle.
The Virginia Attorney General issued an opinion on May 25, 2012, in which he stated “for a handgun to be secured in a container or compartment, such storage tool need not be locked.”
 
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TSiWRX

Professional
When driving, my weapons of choice are alertness to surroundings, spacing, the steering wheel, the accelerator, and the car itself. My firearm is the backup I can use if the need arises.
-and-
Yes sir.
My vehicle is my first line if defense when driving, it gives me over 5,000 pounds of leverage & influence.

Both excellent points (and also, remember, when and if at all possible, the driver should focus on the task of driving - leave the gunning to a trained passenger).

And towards them:


^ This Active Self Defense video really shows just how effective the vehicle is when used as a means to make-distance and/or to actively oppose/resist (the) threat(s).

One thing that I want to highlight for owners of late-model vehicles is that they should take some time to familiarize themselves with the various collision-mitigation and other active-safety features that their newer vehicles may come with.

Take some time to not only read the manuals which detail how these systems operate, but also spend some time to figure out how they work in real-life. Cardboard boxes and other "soft" obstacles -giant stuffed animals work great, too!- can be used to elicit much of the programmed behaviors of the vehicle's sensors and firmware/software.

Thinking that you'll just floor the pedal to run-over an visibly armed illegal roadblock works great in-theory until your forward anti-collision system decides to slam on the brakes and bring the vehicle to a dead-stop only feet away from the obstacle it sees/senses in the roadway. Same for reversing-out.

Drivers of modern vehicles as of the last 25 years should also understand the implications of their SRS-Airbag systems and other injury-mitigation systems, which may include fuel shut-off or other ECU-mediated limitations. Commonly-taught "ramming" (pushing) tactics may not be compatible with your vehicle. [ And before folks jump in here to say this is the reason why their older vehicles are superior, we should all remember that our chances of being in a motor-vehicle-collision due to everyday driving is much, much higher than our need to use the vehicle to escape any "threat," here, CONUS. Underplaying a modern vehicle's drastically increased occupant-safety capabilities is disingenuous, at-best. ].
 
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