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For FORD owners that don't know

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
Am thinking some of the cheaper thinner quality and shoddier mfg. materials started because of unrealistic government expectations and interventions of and for better fuel economy and emission standards into vehicle manufacturing before manufacturers were ready to implement them.

Then in order to increase economy, manufacturers reduced weight in almost any way they could to conserve fuel and partially reduce emissions. Then, after that, somewhere along the line, planned obsolescence, where purposeful lower quality likely took over? For example: Looked at a brand new GMC truck, the driveshaft was already rusty and it hadn't even left the dealerships lot. Not a lick of OEM paint on the driveshaft.
I agree
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
Am thinking some of the cheaper thinner quality and shoddier mfg. materials started because of unrealistic government expectations and interventions of and for better fuel economy and emission standards into vehicle manufacturing before manufacturers were ready to implement them.

Then in order to increase economy, manufacturers reduced weight in almost any way they could to conserve fuel and partially reduce emissions. Then, after that, somewhere along the line, planned obsolescence, where purposeful lower quality likely took over? For example: Looked at a brand new GMC truck, the driveshaft was already rusty and it hadn't even left the dealerships lot. Not a lick of OEM paint on the driveshaft.
Bob, I'm not certain but I believe most all GM 1500 (not sure about the heavier ones) trucks have been supplied with aluminum drive shafts since about 1999 or so. No paint needed. I can only guess it was an effort to reduce weight .....?

And generally speaking you're pretty close to how it all happened both concerning EPA regs, and weight reduction efforts.
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
Maybe.
Know lots of folks who are meticulous with their vehicle care/maintenance and the poor materials from the manufacturer(s) give out way to soon.
Yeh, I agree. I was just talking in general, there are always certain specific issues in all brands. It's just a matter of seeing how many are still on the road compared to how many sold over any particular time period usually will be a relatively good indicator.
 

Talyn

Ronin
Founding Member
Never had a "death wobble" nor alingment issues with the Ford F250/350 I drove through the 90's and 2000's, and the F150's on the farm in the 70's..

The only "death wooble" was from the old Dodges we drove in the late 70's/early 80's.. We called them death machines.
 
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BobM

Ronin
Bob, I'm not certain but I believe most all GM 1500 (not sure about the heavier ones) trucks have been supplied with aluminum drive shafts since about 1999 or so. No paint needed. I can only guess it was an effort to reduce weight .....?

And generally speaking you're pretty close to how it all happened both concerning EPA regs, and weight reduction efforts.
JJ, was 2500 - was steel drive shaft covered with surface rust.
 

Jimbo

Elite
I owned a S10 and at 25k miles the truck started shaking violently when braking, I took it to the selling dealership and was told that I must have driven through a puddle when the rotors were hot and they warped. They refused to help replace them.
I'd a told him, "Do you mean that Chevrolet builds their trucks so cheaply that the rotors will warp just from driving through a puddle?" (You gotta admit, that's pretty bad!)

I've always liked the looks of an S10. Glad I never bought one.
 
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