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Gunsmiths!

So for those that don't know, I'm a gunsmithing student and I just started labor day.
One of the things that really draws me is tuning guns (no practice yet but I'm working on some ideas) and in particular stock making. When making an axe handle I know what I'm looking for... When it comes to gunstocks I'm clueless.
Am I looking for the same qualities in stock wood that I would be for handles?

Also, how are laminated stocks made?
 

xdman

Moderator
Staff member
”woodworking“ is a specialty on it’s own, few and far between. If you get good, you can quickly make a name for your self.
 

BobM

Ronin
I make my own tool handles (axe handles, hammer handles etc) but I not sure about gunstocks
This video covers some wood selection, but not too indepth as far as grain and wood type goes.
Wasn't going to post it because of the lack of indepth detail on wood selection.....Although saw it has some very good ideas for fitting instructions and tips. Those together seem to make a difference to me and may give you a good idea of what all's involved?

 
So for those that don't know, I'm a gunsmithing student and I just started labor day.
One of the things that really draws me is tuning guns (no practice yet but I'm working on some ideas) and in particular stock making. When making an axe handle I know what I'm looking for... When it comes to gunstocks I'm clueless.
Am I looking for the same qualities in stock wood that I would be for handles?

Also, how are laminated stocks made?
Laminated stocks are made just like plywood is made, very difficult for the layman as you need to use a press to squeeze out the glue evenly as it drys.
Also keep in mind if your lucky enough to secure some gun stock blanks during the wood curing process they dried to a moisture content between 6-8% If they are allowed to go above or below that moisture level while you work on it you will end up with cracking or warpage.
 
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