testtest

H2 Buffers "out of stock"

Bear007

Master Class
Anyone know who does have any H2 buffers in stock? I never mess with guns too much when I buy them but I was thinking of testing out an H2 buffer in my SA .308 Saint Victor. Hard to test if I can't find one anywhere. Though its an AR-10, its buffer is the exact same size as the buffer in my Ruger ar-556. The Ruger buffer weighs 3.0 oz and the SA-10 buffer weighs 3.8 oz.
 

10mmLife

Moderator
Staff member
Founding Member
Like @TEXASforLIFE recommend Primary Arms has pretty much everything you need for AR's of all types.

Here is a great option to tune your buffer system. The Odin has adjustable weights so you can have a 3.45oz to 4.65oz just by switching out the weights to find the best combination that works with your rifle.

 

Bear007

Master Class
Like @TEXASforLIFE recommend Primary Arms has pretty much everything you need for AR's of all types.

Here is a great option to tune your buffer system. The Odin has adjustable weights so you can have a 3.45oz to 4.65oz just by switching out the weights to find the best combination that works with your rifle.

@10mmLife, @TEXASforLIFE,

That leads right back to my question about which one to order??? The AR-15 and AR-10 buffers I see online are 2 different sizes, the AR-10 being shorter. The buffer that came in my SA AR-10 buffer 6 weeks ago is actually the same size as an AR-15 size buffer. My AR-10 buffer tube is 3/4" longer than the buffer tube on my Ruger AR-15 which I'm guessing makes up the difference for the longer BCG in the AR-10.

So I'm thinking I buy the AR-15 size buffer. Yes/no???
 

Susquash

Master Class
Founding Member
Like a few have already said, Contact Primary Arms tomorrow
Perhaps they will be able to advise you if a special buffer is needed. KAK also sells kit to make buffer any weight you may need.
 

TSiWRX

Professional
@Bear007 , are you comfortable pulling the buffer assembly open? If so, you can buy tungsten weights such as the ones from Geissele (link via Brownells) - https://www.brownells.com/rifle-par...uper-42-tungsten-buffer-weight-prod87957.aspx - and "roll your own."

ARcarrifle_buffer_exploded_view.jpg


^ Image taken from ARFCOM - I don't currently have access to my own notes to double-check the numbers, but IIRC, these seem correct.....
 

Bear007

Master Class
^ no problem getting the roll pin out but the bumper doesn't want to budge, almost like its glued in. I'll wait until I have a spare before marring it up trying to get it out.

I'm just going to order the exact same size (ar-15) Odin buffer, dimension wise it appears that's what it should be since the buffer tube is 3/4" longer than an ar-15 tube.

I was actually just a little curious what size and weight buffers other SA AR-10 Victor owners on this forum might have in their rifles.

Thanks for all your thoughts.
 
I am curious though, why my SA AR-10 Victor has the same size buffer as an AR-15? Most AR-10 buffers actually look shorter than the AR-15 buffers. I know AR-10's have no standard specs.
Although diameter is the same, but length is usually shorter in both carbine and rifle buffers. Some have different buffer tube lengths that change the game. Like geissele (not sure if it's spelled correctly) and vltor with their own length. Strike Industries has an adjustable buffer also, but not sure about the AR10 platform. Measuring the length where it is only a 1/8 to 1/16 difference shouldn't cause any issues as for buffer springs can be the same way (free spring length). Under compression should be where it makes more reason. There is after wear that springs become shorter and have an average of minimum length for reliable cycling. I like using a valve spring compression press too check springs at compressed length. No company I know of produces such info. My mechanical mindness makes me do or want too know these things. Curse you OCPD! My inquisitive mind wants too know🤬🤬🤬🤬🤬🤬🤬!
 
^ no problem getting the roll pin out but the bumper doesn't want to budge, almost like its glued in. I'll wait until I have a spare before marring it up trying to get it out.

I'm just going to order the exact same size (ar-15) Odin buffer, dimension wise it appears that's what it should be since the buffer tube is 3/4" longer than an ar-15 tube.

I was actually just a little curious what size and weight buffers other SA AR-10 Victor owners on this forum might have in their rifles.

Thanks for all your thoughts.
Some have threads and need too be unscrewed. Remove from the front not the rubber back(bumper).
 
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10mmLife

Moderator
Staff member
Founding Member
Anyone know who does have any H2 buffers in stock? I never mess with guns too much when I buy them but I was thinking of testing out an H2 buffer in my SA .308 Saint Victor. Hard to test if I can't find one anywhere. Though its an AR-10, its buffer is the exact same size as the buffer in my Ruger ar-556. The Ruger buffer weighs 3.0 oz and the SA-10 buffer weighs 3.8 oz.
H3 buffers are used more often in an AR-308 build then a H2.

I used a 5.3oz stainless buffer in a recent build and the rifle has a really soft recoil compared to another build where I used a lighter buffer.
 
Strike Industries only make an adjustable buffer (h1-h3 weight) for AR15. Odin make lite and heavy versions (adjustable weight) only for AR15 and just the 1 style for AR10. I do have both AR15 versions from Odin.
 

Bear007

Master Class
Although diameter is the same, but length is usually shorter in both carbine and rifle buffers. Some have different buffer tube lengths that change the game. Like geissele (not sure if it's spelled correctly) and vltor with their own length. Strike Industries has an adjustable buffer also, but not sure about the AR10 platform. Measuring the length where it is only a 1/8 to 1/16 difference shouldn't cause any issues as for buffer springs can be the same way (free spring length). Under compression should be where it makes more reason. There is after wear that springs become shorter and have an average of minimum length for reliable cycling. I like using a valve spring compression press too check springs at compressed length. No company I know of produces such info. My mechanical mindness makes me do or want too know these things. Curse you OCPD! My inquisitive mind wants too know🤬🤬🤬🤬🤬🤬🤬!
I too like to take apart and understand things, and I eventually do. I spent 45 years in the elevator trade. First 9 years in the field then the rest was the field engineer for all departments ... maintenance, repair, new installation and modernization, both company equipment and non-company equipment, electrically, mechanically and software, through U.S. and some Canada.

Kind of my motto regarding unknown parts or equipment was,

"If it's broke, take the d--- thing apart to see what makes it tick. You can't hurt it any more than BROKE.
If it's still working but suspicious leave it alone until we get a backup part."

To me, it was more important to keep the customer's elevator running for them, as long as it was still safe, before damaging a part that may not be the problem and shutting the elevator down.

So all that being said, I am guessing SA decided to use the same buffer as the AR-15, they just increased the buffer tube 3/4" and changed to a heavier spring that is 5/8" longer than the one in my AR-15 to make up for the longer AR-10 BCG. I also think the weights in my buffer have an awful amount of play inside the buffer. It seems to me the buffer could beat itself to death from the inside out as much play as they have.

Being new in the AR game I'm really surprised at how little information the manufacturers give you on the gun and it's parts, ie, the buffer, adjustable gas block, etc. As the one SA tech told me, "The AR-10 should have it's own manual! It's that much different."

I'm just taking it slow, learning and digesting what I can. Ultimately, I think my rifle can run smoother than it does, but I'm not in a hurry to get there.

Odin AR-15 buffer has ordered.
 
I too like to take apart and understand things, and I eventually do. I spent 45 years in the elevator trade. First 9 years in the field then the rest was the field engineer for all departments ... maintenance, repair, new installation and modernization, both company equipment and non-company equipment, electrically, mechanically and software, through U.S. and some Canada.

Kind of my motto regarding unknown parts or equipment was,

"If it's broke, take the d--- thing apart to see what makes it tick. You can't hurt it any more than BROKE.
If it's still working but suspicious leave it alone until we get a backup part."

To me, it was more important to keep the customer's elevator running for them, as long as it was still safe, before damaging a part that may not be the problem and shutting the elevator down.

So all that being said, I am guessing SA decided to use the same buffer as the AR-15, they just increased the buffer tube 3/4" and changed to a heavier spring that is 5/8" longer than the one in my AR-15 to make up for the longer AR-10 BCG. I also think the weights in my buffer have an awful amount of play inside the buffer. It seems to me the buffer could beat itself to death from the inside out as much play as they have.

Being new in the AR game I'm really surprised at how little information the manufacturers give you on the gun and it's parts, ie, the buffer, adjustable gas block, etc. As the one SA tech told me, "The AR-10 should have it's own manual! It's that much different."

I'm just taking it slow, learning and digesting what I can. Ultimately, I think my rifle can run smoother than it does, but I'm not in a hurry to get there.

Odin AR-15 buffer has ordered.
It's supposed to have the play. It give it conetic energy without having a greater mass/weight. Like removing a bullet from a complete round. The powder acts like the hammer. That's also the reason for the rubber spacers inside too reduce the blow/wear on parts.
 

Bear007

Master Class
Progress ... Just learned a little more over at ar15.com.

The SA AR-10 Victor has the 1st setup, a longer buffer receiver with a longer spring and the same size buffer as an AR-15. Now I know the difference and was fine ordering the ar-15 Odin buffer.

The 2nd setup uses the same buffer receiver length and spring length as an ar-15 but needs a 0.75" shorter buffer due to the longer BCG.

1) An Armalite AR-10 style receiver extension is about 8" long. An Armalite AR-10 style buffer is about 3.25" long.

2) A DPMS LR-308 style receiver extension is about 7.25" long. A DPMS LR-308 style buffer is about 2.5" long.
 

10mmLife

Moderator
Staff member
Founding Member
Progress ... Just learned a little more over at ar15.com.

The SA AR-10 Victor has the 1st setup, a longer buffer receiver with a longer spring and the same size buffer as an AR-15. Now I know the difference and was fine ordering the ar-15 Odin buffer.

The 2nd setup uses the same buffer receiver length and spring length as an ar-15 but needs a 0.75" shorter buffer due to the longer BCG.

1) An Armalite AR-10 style receiver extension is about 8" long. An Armalite AR-10 style buffer is about 3.25" long.

2) A DPMS LR-308 style receiver extension is about 7.25" long. A DPMS LR-308 style buffer is about 2.5" long.
There's definitely some major differences between the ArmaLite AR-10 and LR-308 rifles. Fortunately most of the AR .308 platform parts you will find online are made for the more popular LR-308 platform of rifles which most manufacturer's base their version of the .308 semi AR on.

Some manufacturer's will even have ArmaLite style cut receiver's but most likely be threaded for the more popular DPMS style barrel nut which requires a DPMS style barrel & BCG.
 
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