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How To Use the Hellcat RDP Compensator

I was considering getting one of these or some other lightweight concealed carry because for now I've got a glock 26 that feels more like a brick than a concealed carry handgun. But after seeing the negligible difference in that crazy recoil I've decided against it. It would have made sense if the thing had stayed almost level but it's kicking back just as far as the uncompensated hellcat.
 
Better yet, send your barrel and slide to Mag-Na-Port in Michigan and have them port it. That way you don't have that ugly device hanging on the end of your pistol. Only other reason would be for a threaded barrel.
 

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I was considering getting one of these or some other lightweight concealed carry because for now I've got a glock 26 that feels more like a brick than a concealed carry handgun. But after seeing the negligible difference in that crazy recoil I've decided against it. It would have made sense if the thing had stayed almost level but it's kicking back just as far as the uncompensated hellcat.
Check out Mag-Na-Port bro. I used to CCW a Glock 26. That'd be great for it.
 

fordag

Operator
I would not have a carry gun with a compensator or porting. I will never forget being on a night fire qualification course and one of the agents present had his newly magna ported .357 revolver. Well the first rounds of the course were fired from retention. He did his speed rock and fired. His shooting glasses were blow off his face. The flash was quite bright and left a lasting impression for a few minutes. The flash directed out and up from the barrel was distinctly worse at night than that from an unported .357.

I have fired several ported and compensated guns over the years. None of them performed so well that I felt it was worth the negatives that go with them, so I've never owned one.

I think compensators or porting are fine for competition guns if you feel it gives you the edge you need.
 
I would not have a carry gun with a compensator or porting. I will never forget being on a night fire qualification course and one of the agents present had his newly magna ported .357 revolver. Well the first rounds of the course were fired from retention. He did his speed rock and fired. His shooting glasses were blow off his face. The flash was quite bright and left a lasting impression for a few minutes. The flash directed out and up from the barrel was distinctly worse at night than that from an unported .357.

I have fired several ported and compensated guns over the years. None of them performed so well that I felt it was worth the negatives that go with them, so I've never owned one.

I think compensators or porting are fine for competition guns if you feel it gives you the edge you need.
I don't know how that could've happened Dag but I have never had any problems with anything like that. I shoot in daylight and low light w/o problems. Of course muzzle flare in night scenarios is always a a factor at any any rate.
 

conax

Elite
Well, I like the longer barrel the compensator brought the gun. The comp looks neat if nothing else and an included thread protector makes its use optional. I don't find the Hellcat snappish at all, it's really a lot of fun to shoot. Maybe the compensator takes the edge off or something.. I haven't tried it without it- at the range there's no reason to leave it off. People on other sites (in their comments) are clamoring for SA to sell the barrel and comp separately.

First day out with the red dot after a few groups shot getting used to the trigger, I got a 5 shot 2" group at 13 yards. I've been trying longer ranges and have busted clays at 25 yards pretty easily. With a striker fired pistol this is very good for me. I'm not very good with semi-autos in general, especially these things.
Normally I stick to revolvers but this little dude sucked me in. It has a solid balanced feel, is pretty accurate and so far has had no malfunctions at all. In that regard it reminds me of my old Ruger P90 .45.

If you price the standard gun, then consider the longer threaded barrel and the red dot made for the pistol, the price is fair. (I got mine at a nice discount, no card fee and free shipping) If you don't like the Hex wasp, you could sell it and put on something else or just go with the nice irons and pocket the cash.
I just saw a video where they put 10,000 rounds of +P ammo through one without a hiccup. That's about 3 times more than I will ever shoot.
 

Bear007

Elite
If you ever need to hold your firearm very close to the body to engage, you'll soon wish that flame was going 100% forward into the perp instead of your face, neck and arms.
I would not have a carry gun with a compensator or porting. I will never forget being on a night fire qualification course and one of the agents present had his newly magna ported .357 revolver. Well the first rounds of the course were fired from retention. He did his speed rock and fired. His shooting glasses were blow off his face. The flash was quite bright and left a lasting impression for a few minutes. The flash directed out and up from the barrel was distinctly worse at night than that from an unported .357.

I have fired several ported and compensated guns over the years. None of them performed so well that I felt it was worth the negatives that go with them, so I've never owned one.

I think compensators or porting are fine for competition guns if you feel it gives you the edge you need.
I've never had a compensator on a handgun but both of the above, close quarters and night flash, seem to be real concerns or at the very least something to think about.

Maybe "Justin Opinion" can do a night video showing the differences in the night flash with and without the compensator. He likes to compare things.

The RDP is one my brother in law is considering. He lives in the country and it is very dark out at night when they have to go out to defend the chickens. He may not want the compensator on then.
 

fordag

Operator
I've never had a compensator on a handgun but both of the above, close quarters and night flash, seem to be real concerns or at the very least something to think about.

Maybe "Justin Opinion" can do a night video showing the differences in the night flash with and without the compensator. He likes to compare things.
An important aspect of that comparison video would be the need to use ammunition that's really going to take advantadge of a compensator. Specifically +P as was used in the originally posted video.

Also have some fabric immediately to the side of the pistol, just as it would be in a speed rock situation.
 

Bear007

Elite
An important aspect of that comparison video would be the need to use ammunition that's really going to take advantadge of a compensator. Specifically +P as was used in the originally posted video.

Also have some fabric immediately to the side of the pistol, just as it would be in a speed rock situation.
Well it might not be a Hellcat RDP but I just burned up my range bag with my SA AR-10 muzzle brake, ugh!

I just posted it under SKILLS/Dumb Dumb.
 

Rene

Alpha
Interesting Video.
The main question for me is: is the lower recoil due to the function of the compensator or to the additional weight at the muzzle?
 

Bear007

Elite
Interesting Video.
The main question for me is: is the lower recoil due to the function of the compensator or to the additional weight at the muzzle?
The additional weight with the 3.8" threaded barrel vs the 3" standard barrel and the compensator attached is only 1.4 oz according to the specs. I would have to guess it the compensator.
 
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