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LE Lessons for the Armed Citizen: Do You Know the 10 Deadly Errors?

Old_Me

Professional
  1. Failure to Maintain Equipment & Proficiency
this is why (and it's just my way), i clean and lube ANY gun i take to the range, even if i only put (say) as little as 25 rounds thru it.

waste of time..?? lube..??

to some, maybe yes.

but each time i field strip MY gun(s), i check for any possible broken parts, such as springs.

as far as "proficiency"?

this is why i try to get to the range or club as much as 2 times per week, some weeks a couple of extra trips.

i'll never be the expert marksman that some are, but i hope to be proficient enough to put a bad guy down, with as few rounds as possible, with a clean, well maintained firearm.
 
I never worked as a cop but I spent 15 years as a security guard dealing with some of the same petty criminals.

Even doing that I learned that there are ways you do things. I know what it looks like when people are trying to get into your space because I've seen people countless times who were trying to get into my space. I know what interviews look like for the same reason. I'm very familiar with all of Masad Ayoob's classic pre assault indicators because I've literally watched people go through every single one of them like they were reading from a list right before they attacked somebody.

My wife bought me all seven seasons of Adam-12. I watch an episode or two a week and I realize it's TV and I realize it's the late 60s and early 70s but I watch them interact with suspects and do traffic stops and they do things that no cop in their right mind would do today.

They interact with people in a way that I as a security guard never would have interacted with people. Although, I have seen my stupid coworkers do it on multiple occasions.
 

Flyboy514

Operator
Thanks SA for this article, it came just at the right time... I'm attending a Concealed Carry Permit training class next week and your advice will only help me be the responsible gun owner/carrier I need & want to be. I'm grateful to be apart of the Armory Life community, because of articles like this one and all the previous one's I've seen over the past few years.
 

AmbGun

Operator
I good way to get beyond Tombstone Courage is to play paintball...not the woods-ball variety, but the crucible of X-Ball, tournament paintball. And in a fun way you'll learn: 1) I'm not invulnerable an 2) how to make "optimal use of cover". Among other gunfighter virtues.
 

HayesGreener

Professional
Good article. Pierce Brooks' book Officer Down Code 3 became the bible for officer survival training in the 70's. The Tactical Edge series of books and training films built on those lessons. Unfortunately, much of the survival training developed in the day seems to have dissipated as officers of that generation have retired. I have read about officers being killed in recent years who broke the rules and paid the price. I am especially concerned about the tactics of approach to danger. I believe compassionate policing and good sound tactics can co-exist in a well-trained department and there are many lessons civilians can learn from the LE experience.
 

HayesGreener

Professional
  1. Failure to Maintain Equipment & Proficiency
this is why (and it's just my way), i clean and lube ANY gun i take to the range, even if i only put (say) as little as 25 rounds thru it.

waste of time..?? lube..??

to some, maybe yes.

but each time i field strip MY gun(s), i check for any possible broken parts, such as springs.

as far as "proficiency"?

this is why i try to get to the range or club as much as 2 times per week, some weeks a couple of extra trips.

i'll never be the expert marksman that some are, but i hope to be proficient enough to put a bad guy down, with as few rounds as possible, with a clean, well maintained firearm.
Absolutely! Clean and maintain your guns like your life depends on it.
 
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