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What Does "Brandishing" a Gun Mean?

jumpinjoe

Professional
The definition of the word 'brandishing' usually includes qualifiers such as “in a rude, angry or threatening manner”, or something similar. However, in some cases in some places, just a simple momentary exposure of a weapon, not even necessarily a firearm, can be legally considered 'brandishing'.

That in itself is a very good reason for us all to work towards "Constitutional Carry" in every state across the country. That would eliminate all the indecision and confusion in our various gun laws. At some point we should all hope for a SCOTUS ruling on the 2nd that it means exactly what it says ..... nothing more-nothing less!

Just a little something to ponder y'all !!! (y)(y)(y)
 

BobM

Hellcat
The definition of the word 'brandishing' usually includes qualifiers such as “in a rude, angry or threatening manner”, or something similar. However, in some cases in some places, just a simple momentary exposure of a weapon, not even necessarily a firearm, can be legally considered 'brandishing'.

That in itself is a very good reason for us all to work towards "Constitutional Carry" in every state across the country. That would eliminate all the indecision and confusion in our various gun laws. At some point we should all hope for a SCOTUS ruling on the 2nd that it means exactly what it says ..... nothing more-nothing less!

Just a little something to ponder y'all !!! (y)(y)(y)
Same with age limits. There are documented 10 ear olds that'll give seasoned shooters run for their money and 50 year olds that shouldn't like even be allowed to look at guns. Like 10 year old kid with cheapy Zebco rod and reel catching trophy fish?

Age laws and limitations shouldn't even be considered, let alone be written, because they're too generalized....penalizing good people with poor laws isn't a good answer, it's adding problems to another poorly implemented problem.
 

Peglegjoe

Professional
Founding Member
"Brandishing" as far as weaponry and guns is, unfortunately, subjective.

I live in Maryland, where we have a "wear and carry" permit, not a "concealed carry" permit. Maryland, once you are licensed, does not legally distinguish between concealed and open carry. We can carry open, or concealed, once we have our permit.

Attention from LEOs can come simply from a Karen being uppity and nervous.

I carry for my job - concert production. I move a lot of heavy equipment, and have to bend/reach/stretch to pick up and set up the equipment. One day setting up for a concert, apparently my shirt rode up (I do get "tall" sized shirts for just this purpose) and my IWB holster peeked for a split second. Some Karen in the crowd saw this, and despite my wearing a shirt with exactly the same colors and logo as ALL the equipment I was working with (I obviously "belonged" at the event), she flagged down the first LEO she saw and made sure he interrupted my setup, just to make sure I "wasn't going to do anything bad". His eyes rolled as he was asking me about it because he knew it was ridiculous...but he had to do his due diligence. To his credit, he did go immediately over to Karen when we were done, and I would guess by her red face he explained at least that I was legally carrying, and possibly the detail that people allowed to carry didn't have to hide it in Maryland. I don't know...but that incident was proof that it does happen.

As far as language goes..."brandishing" requires some content of menace or threat. But when everyone feels threatened by everything that's outside of their "safe space"...well....this is what we get.

Merriam-Webster:

brandish​

verb

bran·dish | \ ˈbran-dish \
brandished; brandishing; brandishes

Definition of brandish

(Entry 1 of 2)
transitive verb
1: to shake or wave (something, such as a weapon) menacingly
(brandished a knife at them)
2: to exhibit in an ostentatious or aggressive manner
 

KASHIRA-3

Elite
What matters is the legal definition where its applicable. If we are simply talking common language or personal lexicon and [not] the law, I consider it to be intentionally displaying a weapon in an aggressive manner.
 
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