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Can Browning's Masterpiece Be Surpassed?

ACIinventor

Operator
Well, there ya go. I'm not a Glock fan so am not familiar with all their hundreds of soulless, lookalike variations.

So it sounds like an EDC-sized 10mm already exists, for those who want one.

Me, I'm quite happy with .45ACP ballistics. I'm also good with .38+P, and the better 9mm loads, of which there are many these days.
Yeah, the Glock 29 is around. But it has an even bigger "brick" slide compared to it's 9mm siblings. Once again, Glock could only use weight to tame the 10mm's recoil in Browning's recoil operated system. And Glock didn't really tame it. I'm glad HansGruber's wrists could take the beating. An operating system that doesn't rely upon additional weight to manage recoil is where the industry must go. It opens the doors to even lighter handguns and higher pressure chamberings.
 

HansGruber

Hellcat
Yeah, the Glock 29 is around. But it has an even bigger "brick" slide compared to it's 9mm siblings. Once again, Glock could only use weight to tame the 10mm's recoil in Browning's recoil operated system. And Glock didn't really tame it. I'm glad your wrists could take the beating. An operating system that doesn't rely upon additional weight to manage recoil is where the industry must go. It opens the doors to even lighter handguns and higher pressure chamberings.
TANSTAAFL.
 

HansGruber

Hellcat
TANSTAAFL.
To add to that:

Having a low mass slide means you will be required to have a very heavy recoil/return spring. I saw this several times 20 or so years ago when titanium 1911 slides were considered the next "big badA$$" thing...in order to have enough return force to reliably strip a fresh cartridge out of the mag, the low mass slide had to be slammed forward HARD. Serious detriment to accuracy (caused severe muzzle dip), really hard to work the slide under the best of circumstances...under stress with wet/bloody hands? Not gonna happen.

This has been tried, you know: rotary barrel (see Beretta Cougar, Grand Power K100, and Glock 47, for example...none terribly successful), a toggle bolt (see the Luger--great pistol, famously unreliable) or perhaps gas retarded blowback (see the HK P7--incredible pistol, but not cost efficient enough for even HK to keep making).

It just brings us back to TANSTAAFL.
 

ACIinventor

Operator
To add to that:

Having a low mass slide means you will be required to have a very heavy recoil/return spring. I saw this several times 20 or so years ago when titanium 1911 slides were considered the next "big badA$$" thing...in order to have enough return force to reliably strip a fresh cartridge out of the mag, the low mass slide had to be slammed forward HARD. Serious detriment to accuracy (caused severe muzzle dip), really hard to work the slide under the best of circumstances...under stress with wet/bloody hands? Not gonna happen.

This has been tried, you know: rotary barrel (see Beretta Cougar, Grand Power K100, and Glock 47, for example...none terribly successful), a toggle bolt (see the Luger--great pistol, famously unreliable) or perhaps gas retarded blowback (see the HK P7--incredible pistol, but not cost efficient enough for even HK to keep making).

It just brings us back to TANSTAAFL.
Was that enough return force to strip a fresh cartridge out of the mag, drive the barrel forward, tilt the barrel up, and lock the breech?

Another question: Do you know any striker fired pistols where the striker is cocked while the slide is moving rearward? I remember reading about one recently but can't remember who made it. Most striker fired pistols have the slide cocking the striker while moving forward. Thanks!
 
I've got a 3" 65-3...it's just plain perfect.

Also have a 3" Python Elite barrel that I'm tempted to have put on my 4" stainless Python, just because I can.
When ever someone mentions doing any type of custom work to a Colt Python I always think about the Python from the movie Electra Glide In Blue with Robert Blake . His best friend and fellow motor officer had a four inch blue Python with a nickle cylinder and barrel. I guess it was my age at the time and about the time I got my first Python but I thought that gun was beautiful.
 

HansGruber

Hellcat
Was that enough return force to strip a fresh cartridge out of the mag, drive the barrel forward, tilt the barrel up, and lock the breech?

Another question: Do you know any striker fired pistols where the striker is cocked while the slide is moving rearward? I remember reading about one recently but can't remember who made it. Most striker fired pistols have the slide cocking the striker while moving forward. Thanks!
That’s how a 1911 works, so…yes.

If you run a fixed barrel (aka, blowback), you need an even stronger recoil spring to keep the slide locked until pressure drops. Even roller locked pistols (CZ52, HK P9/P9S) have pretty stout recoil springs.
 

ACIinventor

Operator
That’s how a 1911 works, so…yes.

If you run a fixed barrel (aka, blowback), you need an even stronger recoil spring to keep the slide locked until pressure drops. Even roller locked pistols (CZ52, HK P9/P9S) have pretty stout recoil springs.
"Having a low mass slide means you will be required to have a very heavy recoil/return spring." - this only applies to the Browning recoil operating system. My new operating system works differently from a 1911. I wish I could explain but I don't want to disclose proprietary information. Just know that this is a consideration I've addressed with my design. A low mass slide is quite possible with my new operating system. Thank you for mentioning titanium. I'll have to compare it to the scandium I was considering for slide material. I don't know how I could have forgotten about titanium!?! I've even addressed the slide manipulation issue. Grandma will be able to pull the slide back on my new handgun.
"Serious detriment to accuracy (caused severe muzzle dip)..." - again, this only applies to the Browning recoil operating system and probably not an accuracy issue. By the time the slide slams forward, that bullet has been long gone. However, any muzzle dip would cause problems for sight alignment for a second shot. I agree, keeping the handgun cycling smoothly throughout firing will only help the shooter.
 
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