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Dry run on my first Prime Rib on the smoker. Need to make some adjustments and changes.

Onewolf426

Master Class
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Onewolf426

Master Class
How are you prepping the cut and what rub are you using? We just got a Chargrill big east Oiless Turkey fry on sale at academy. Itching to use it.
I made my own rub. Himalayan Sea Salt, Garlic Powder, Onion Powder, Paprika, Chili Powder, Black Ground Pepper. I added Rosemary and Thyme, which was a mistake. I used oak and mesquite wood with charcoal. It had a slight bitter taste in the crust, which may be from the Thyme reacting with the smoke, or too much smoke. It was good otherwise. May also do a reverse sear on it. I bought it already tied with the long bones removed. From Publix.
 

SaltyMonkey

Custom
I made my own rub. Himalayan Sea Salt, Garlic Powder, Onion Powder, Paprika, Chili Powder, Black Ground Pepper. I added Rosemary and Thyme, which was a mistake. I used oak and mesquite wood with charcoal. It had a slight bitter taste in the crust, which may be from the Thyme reacting with the smoke, or too much smoke. It was good otherwise. May also do a reverse sear on it.
Look delicious.
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
I'll have to agree with Hans, that bark looks pretty heavy and the mesquite is the likely culprit. It and the combination with the Oak is a pretty heavy dose of smoke for something as delicate as prime rib.

What was your cook time (how long) and at what temperature...... for what weight of roast?
 
I don't know about mesquite and oak together, but I can tell you mesquite and hickory (mesquite 2/3 to 1/3 hickory) is outstanding. I use the combo on ribs, chicken, fish and all beef. I've thought about applewood and pecan (not mixed). No experience with either.
 

Jfal

Custom
Most meats need only 2-4 hours of smoke. Longer creates the bitter bark. As Killer said, moving to the oven is a great option, although you can simply stop adding wood after your preferred period of time (if you have that type of smoker).

For tips, a good website is www.amazingribs.com, note the comments section(s), as much of the valuable information is in the discussions from the mods with customers/users.
 

HayesGreener

Professional
I cook on my Big Green Egg several times a week. Of all the cuts of meat I have cooked over the past 10 years, I am most meticulous about prime rib. It is an expensive cut and really easy to overcook if you don't watch the temp carefully. No parsley sage or thyme, that's good for turkey.

I have found that some folks do not like mesquite smoke and it can cause stomach upset for some so I use BGE lump and some pecan scraps in my BGE. BGE lump is from oak and hickory.

I use Adam Perry Lang's prime rib recipe I smoke a prime rib at 275 and pull it at 125 degrees internal to get medium rare. It takes about 3.5 hours total. It will continue cooking for a bit after you pull it. APL recipes have a lot of steps and ingredients but it pays off. The crust from the glaze is wonderful. I think the beef paste is key. You can find his recipes on line.
 

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