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Helps and hints?

80lancer

Alpha
I'm starting to get ready for my first deer hunt next week. I have a nothern buck tag and I'm thinking I'll go up Logan canyon because it's one of the only areas in the northern region I'm familiar with. This is my first time hunting anything. I haven't had had much time to scout because I live in the centeral region and cannot get up to logan very often. But I have been scouting in an area where I live hoping maybe I can figure out some generalizations that will be usefull when I get up there. I've also been practicing with my rifle and am shooting moa groups. Can anyone think of any last hints to give me to help me be successful?
 

David N.

Professional
Founding Member
My last minute advice world be to just enjoy the journey to deer hunting. It's not so much about harvesting a deer as much as enjoying your time in the outdoors. It's even more enjoyable if you can share it with someone.

A good read is the Deer Hunter's Almanac published by one of America's oldest outdoor magazines Sports Afield. It's chocked full of tips and advice from hunters.

Good luck, be safe, and enjoy your time afield.
 

the obsrver

Master Class
My last minute advice world be to just enjoy the journey to deer hunting. It's not so much about harvesting a deer as much as enjoying your time in the outdoors. It's even more enjoyable if you can share it with someone.

A good read is the Deer Hunter's Almanac published by one of America's oldest outdoor magazines Sports Afield. It's chocked full of tips and advice from hunters.

Good luck, be safe, and enjoy your time afield.

That would be my advice as well. Unless you are starving, just enjoy and do not take the first one you see. To many people get all excited and take the first one they see.
 

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
I'm starting to get ready for my first deer hunt next week. I have a nothern buck tag and I'm thinking I'll go up Logan canyon because it's one of the only areas in the northern region I'm familiar with. This is my first time hunting anything. I haven't had had much time to scout because I live in the centeral region and cannot get up to logan very often. But I have been scouting in an area where I live hoping maybe I can figure out some generalizations that will be usefull when I get up there. I've also been practicing with my rifle and am shooting moa groups. Can anyone think of any last hints to give me to help me be successful?
Patience
Lots of patience

depending on weather, layer up or have with you in the field garments for cooler/cold weather, especially at those higher altitudes

good set of binoculars with strap

prep or idea of how you will get the deer out once you have killed it. Especially in a mtn , canyon area . Sled, harvest in field and pack out in backpack, etc, etc ..

good printed map of the area and compass. You can just print one off your home pc for your area of hunt. Cellphones don't always get reception afield

let others know exactly where you will be/area

extra shells in your pocket or pack

Small pocket mirror to signal if needed for help or to show others in your hunt location if they come to help retrieve deer and assist

good flashlight. I prefer hands free, headlamp w new batteries. If you shoot a deer at dusk, last legal light, you will need it
 

Bassbob

Ronin
I'm starting to get ready for my first deer hunt next week. I have a nothern buck tag and I'm thinking I'll go up Logan canyon because it's one of the only areas in the northern region I'm familiar with. This is my first time hunting anything. I haven't had had much time to scout because I live in the centeral region and cannot get up to logan very often. But I have been scouting in an area where I live hoping maybe I can figure out some generalizations that will be usefull when I get up there. I've also been practicing with my rifle and am shooting moa groups. Can anyone think of any last hints to give me to help me be successful?



Get to your stand early. Don't worry about being dead quiet on the way up, but do pick your feet up and try not to make too much excessive noise. Once you are there, be quiet. Minimize movement. Try not to look, smell or sound like a human. After 1/2 hour or so you will melt into the forest and become one with it. Then you will see animals moving around. I'm not familiar with the area you're in so all this may not apply, but squirrels and crows will rat you out. If they are paying attention to you they will make noise to alert their little friends of your presence. Some deer aren't stupid and will get the hint. Deer don't see the way we do. They don't really see colors, they see shapes and movement. I have more than once been standing on the ground and had a deer 10' away from me, both of us frozen. The deer may sense or smell something is there, but as long as you are dead still it won't really see you. If you are hunting from the ground, find a tree and stand with your back to it. If you are out in the open and not against a tree it's going to know that shape is out of place.

Don't shoot a running deer and don't shoot unless you have a clear shot at the vital area, which is behind the front shoulder blades. Wait until the deer is broadside to you and you have a clear shot. If you shoot a deer and it runs, make a note of where it was when you shot it. Find a tree or a landmark to help you. Then STAY PUT for 20 minutes or so before you go and try to find it. If it's still alive and just wounded, moving too soon will spook it and it will run. If you stay put and it was a good hit it will bleed out. Tracking a deer is a whole other ordeal and thankfully one I have no experience with, but the gist of it is you go to where you shot it and look for blood. A lot of blood and tissue may indicate a good hit. Go slow and look thoroughly for a blood trail and follow it. Take slow steps and look around. Flattened brush could mean your deer is laying down there.


Good luck and have fun.
 

BobM

Ronin
Patience
Lots of patience

depending on weather, layer up or have with you in the field garments for cooler/cold weather, especially at those higher altitudes

good set of binoculars with strap

prep or idea of how you will get the deer out once you have killed it. Especially in a mtn , canyon area . Sled, harvest in field and pack out in backpack, etc, etc ..

good printed map of the area and compass. You can just print one off your home pc for your area of hunt. Cellphones don't always get reception afield

let others know exactly where you will be/area

extra shells in your pocket or pack

Small pocket mirror to signal if needed for help or to show others in your hunt location if they come to help retrieve deer and assist

good flashlight. I prefer hands free, headlamp w new batteries. If you shoot a deer at dusk, last legal light, you will need it
"let others know exactly where you will be/area" - and a day and time plan on returning helps too.
Are all good considerations.
 

the obsrver

Master Class
prep or idea of how you will get the deer out once you have killed it. Especially in a mtn , canyon area . Sled, harvest in field and pack out in backpack, etc, etc ..

Definitely. I do not even hunt deer and have a story about that when helping some buddies out.
You pack a gutted deer on your shoulders, out over 2 miles and even with help, you are going to know you did something.
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
Personally, I would not hunt an area I have not reconned.

Be aware of the greatest risk; other hunters! Know where they are.

Get in and set early, listen for other hunters busting the brush to their stand.

If and when you have to move, avoid line of sight to the location of other hunters.

Light/visual alert. Whistle: high pitched mouth blown, also something like the Eco Blast kit you can activate
with a finger if you are unable to blow a whistle.
 
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