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Hot Brass and Safety

If you have been around ranges with semi auto or select fire weapons for any length of time you are probably familiar with the hot brass dance that follows getting a piece of hot brass down your shirt.

A recent fatal recruit training incident brings into focus how dangerous this can be. A recruit died from a self inflicted gunshot while flailing about from hot brass down the shirt. It has happened enough times that standard LE instructor protocol is to require crew necked shirts or buttoned collars, and billed hats in addition to eye and ear protection. Just a reminder, there are good reasons for safety protocols.
 

Old_Me

Custom
If you have been around ranges with semi auto or select fire weapons for any length of time you are probably familiar with the hot brass dance that follows getting a piece of hot brass down your shirt.

A recent fatal recruit training incident brings into focus how dangerous this can be. A recruit died from a self inflicted gunshot while flailing about from hot brass down the shirt. It has happened enough times that standard LE instructor protocol is to require crew necked shirts or buttoned collars, and billed hats in addition to eye and ear protection. Just a reminder, there are good reasons for safety protocols.
oh yes..but even with a baseball cap, and my safety glasses, i have had hot brass, go up under the bill of the hat, and get in between my safety glasses along the temple. i had a nice semi-circular burn, just under my eye..

BUT..!!

i held the gun down range.

but yes, i had seen videos one in particular, where a new shooter(??) still had his gun, and shot himself in the face, and lived..!!


this one...

 

TSiWRX

Custom
Definitely worth bringing up again, and in a dedicated thread. Good call, @HayesGreener . (y)

I wrote about this concern in a past post a few weeks ago:

https://www.thearmorylife.com/forum/threads/a-sure-painful-experience.8722/#post-107402. I'll copy-paste below:


--------


All -

As shooters, we need to remind ourselves that instances such as this can and will happen, and that we need to be mindful of this possibility and realize that it's more important that we keep muzzle and trigger discipline, rather than to dislodge the spent case, no matter how bad the latter happens to be hurting us.

Here's a few notable recent events.....

(1)
concealednation.org

Woman Negligently Shoots Herself After Hot Brass Goes Down Her Shirt – Concealed Nation

Always keep your muzzle pointed down range. I had this happen to a few female friends while at the range (not the shooting part, but the hot-brass-down-shirt part), and one I was actually able to capture on video. Here’s a screen shot from that day, but not from the actual incident: Calm down...
concealednation.org
concealednation.org
^ A write-up on Concealed Nation about an actual event (outlink to media coverage of actual event is included).


(2)
www.nydailynews.com

Father accidentally shot, killed 14-year-old son at Florida gun range after spent shell casing bounced into his shirt

The victim was standing behind his father, who was firing from the last shooting lane.
www.nydailynews.com
www.nydailynews.com
...which was followed up with this interview with the father:
https://www.cnn.com/2016/07/04/us/florida-father-shoots-son/index.html

(3)
A close call for a range worker.....


and (4)
myfox8.com

Video: Man accidentally shoots himself in face at gun range

The man is expected to be OK.
myfox8.com
myfox8.com

^ This event happened at a public indoor range that I frequent, right here in NE-Ohio. (I love the Geauga County Sheriff's Office dearly - they are very pro-2A and extremely nice to work with, for Ohio-CHL applications, but this segment was poorly put together, and I wish their office would have had a say in how the video was edited.)

Particularly for those of us who have been in the hobby/sport for a long time and/or have attended a lot of training (or who may instruct) and/or are competitive shooters, we need to be doubly vigilant and even more careful when we are on the range or otherwise are handling firearms or are engaged in training or competition.



And the following branches out a bit from the spent-case burns detailed above, but still, it's worth bringing up as we're talking about safety. :)

In terms of competition, look at how many get DQ'ed for safety. Breaking the 180 occurs on a routine basis, and not of just inexperienced shooters.



In training?

The first incident below occurred at what is ostensibly a rather "advanced" class:

Statement from the Range Owner Regarding the Recent Accidental Shooting - Soldier Systems Daily

Shoot-house are no joke.

And the event detailed in the following posts occurred just a couple of years ago in what is almost my back yard.

I've always wanted to -and still want to- attend Mas's classes, and this just goes to show that even someone who is often considered a standard-barer can run afoul of the same issues that any beginner or novice can, and perhaps even more highlight the points that my two brothers above have each posted:

LAYERS OF FIREARMS SAFETY: A TEACHABLE MOMENT |
^ Mas's view of the incident.

Lessons from a Negligent Discharge at MAG-40 – Safety Solutions Academy

^ A more comprehensive look, from one of his AI's (and the host) of the class.




Great reminders that we all must always be humble and vigilant.
 

conax

Elite
Dang, I'm sorry for the lady, the dad and the other guy who forgot they were handling a lethal weapon after getting a minor burn from hot brass, but their respect for the guns was lacking. The poor dad, he'll never forgive himself.
I've been shooting since I was about 7 years old and I've gotten singed many times. It doesn't even really bother me anymore. New shooters have to be warned. I like the buttoned up shirt and hat idea. I suppose that might help.
Better is to learn discipline and control your weapon at all times, regardless.
 

conax

Elite
I was just remembering an incident from 30 years ago- I was riding my liter bike (Kawi 4) through a suburb and just past an intersection when I rode into a swarm of bees. A cloud of them. They got up under my face shield, in my jacket and sleeves, dozens of bees all up in my face. I quickly stopped the bike, got off, then threw off the helmet and jacket and started swatting them off myself. But first things first, I stopped and put down the stand and got off.
I didn't get stung because swarming bees don't sting you for some reason.
I was not aware of that at the time. Still, bee stings are nothing compared to wrecking into a car or lamp post on a motorcycle.
Discipline. Keep your head. It pays off.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
I was just remembering an incident from 30 years ago- I was riding my liter bike (Kawi 4) through a suburb and just past an intersection when I rode into a swarm of bees. A cloud of them. They got up under my face shield, in my jacket and sleeves, dozens of bees all up in my face. I quickly stopped the bike, got off, then threw off the helmet and jacket and started swatting them off myself. But first things first, I stopped and put down the stand and got off.
I didn't get stung because swarming bees don't sting you for some reason.
I was not aware of that at the time. Still, bee stings are nothing compared to wrecking into a car or lamp post on a motorcycle.
Discipline. Keep your head. It pays off.

The number one reason most people lose fights. They lose their head. Keep your cool and it's like the Matrix. You can see everything coming like it's in slow motion.
 

javbike

Custom
Totally agree on all the safety warnings also I wear long pants and boots to the range even if it 100 degrees outside. I know it’s easier said then done but if it stings you with hot brass keep the gun facing done range and put it down on the shooting table immediately
 

TSiWRX

Custom
Still, bee stings are nothing compared to wrecking into a car or lamp post on a motorcycle.
Discipline. Keep your head. It pays off.

I've often taught my daughter that "intelligence" is simply being able to differentiate what is most important at any one given moment.



Understand at any given moment what is most/more important. (y)
 

javbike

Custom
If you have been around ranges with semi auto or select fire weapons for any length of time you are probably familiar with the hot brass dance that follows getting a piece of hot brass down your shirt.

A recent fatal recruit training incident brings into focus how dangerous this can be. A recruit died from a self inflicted gunshot while flailing about from hot brass down the shirt. It has happened enough times that standard LE instructor protocol is to require crew necked shirts or buttoned collars, and billed hats in addition to eye and ear protection. Just a reminder, there are good reasons for safety protocols.
Thank for bring this up Hayes
 
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