testtest

LevAR Review: The Ultimate AR Malfunction Buster

KMacK

Alpha
I have a much simpler way to deal with AR Malfunctions: it's called an M-14 or an SKS.
I carried an AR (M-16) in Vietnam and to this day I will not give that house room. The damned thing nearly got me killed twice by jamming when we were under fire.
The military may have kluged it enough to be moderately reliable, but for those of us who carried "Stoner's wonder weapon"... It remains a piece of C**p.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Mr. Untactical

Elite
Founding Member
Hello all, here is today's article posted on TheArmoryLife.com. It is titled "LevAR Review: The Ultimate AR Malfunction Buster" and can be found at https://www.thearmorylife.com/levar-review-the-ultimate-ar-malfunction-buster/.

Interesting concept and one that could be useful. My first AR (Ruger AR556 - I know, I know, I'm working to convince the wife I need a SAINT Victor!) had to be mortared a few times before I sent it back to Ruger for repair. Since I've received the repaired rifle back - zero malfunctions of any kind. In my experience, it's been mechanical/manufacturing issues that caused the failure to eject. Not sure my use case would need this, but it's still kinda cool (y)
 

Bassbob

Ronin
I have a much simpler way to deal with AR Malfunctions: it's called an M-14 or an SKS.
I carried an AR (M-16) in Vietnam and to this day I will not give that house room. The damned thing nearly got me killed twice by jamming when we were under fire.
The military may have kluged it enough to be moderately reliable, but for those of us who carried "Stoner's wonder weapon"... It remains a piece of C**p.
I think you're dating yourself. All the current active duty and Iraq/Afghanistan combat vets I know and train with certainly don't think it's a piece of crap.

For my part I have never had occasion to "Mortar" any of my weapons. I only seen it necessary once and that was a Jarhead buddy of mine who I have known since high school ( so he is my age) loves cheap shite. And he likes steel cased cheap shite.
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
I have a much simpler way to deal with AR Malfunctions: it's called an M-14 or an SKS.
I carried an AR (M-16) in Vietnam and to this day I will not give that house room. The damned thing nearly got me killed twice by jamming when we were under fire.
The military may have kluged it enough to be moderately reliable, but for those of us who carried "Stoner's wonder weapon"... It remains a piece of C**p.
While I understand the trauma of a jammed weapon (or running out of ammo) in a critical situation the reality is that when the 16's were first introduced in the Nam (when were you there?) they did have issues and most kept the cleaning rod assembled and tied/taped/strapped to the weapon for rapid access when those jambs occurred. Various chamber reworks solved the issue and for the remainder of the war and to this day the AR-16/15 has proven most reliable. I have owned and shot many in the fifty five years since with 0 issues. I did see one fail in shoot school a few years back; it was the "loner" AR owned by the school and had shot untold numbers of rounds for many years and never was cleaned! It turned out that hygiene was the only issue and after cleaning a ton of **** from it was back in service.

My guess is that along the line somewhere there has been M-14, SKS, and every other firearm malfunctions from a plethora of causes.

I'll ask: how many on this forum have no confidence in the AR?
 

ddeuce22

Master Class
While I understand the trauma of a jammed weapon (or running out of ammo) in a critical situation the reality is that when the 16's were first introduced in the Nam (when were you there?) they did have issues and most kept the cleaning rod assembled and tied/taped/strapped to the weapon for rapid access when those jambs occurred. Various chamber reworks solved the issue and for the remainder of the war and to this day the AR-16/15 has proven most reliable. I have owned and shot many in the fifty five years since with 0 issues. I did see one fail in shoot school a few years back; it was the "loner" AR owned by the school and had shot untold numbers of rounds for many years and never was cleaned! It turned out that hygiene was the only issue and after cleaning a ton of **** from it was back in service.

My guess is that along the line somewhere there has been M-14, SKS, and every other firearm malfunctions from a plethora of causes.

I'll ask: how many on this forum have no confidence in the AR?

I've had zero issues with my Sig M400 Tread. Would without hesitation trust my life with it. 100% Confidence.
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
I have a much simpler way to deal with AR Malfunctions: it's called an M-14 or an SKS.
I carried an AR (M-16) in Vietnam and to this day I will not give that house room. The damned thing nearly got me killed twice by jamming when we were under fire.
The military may have kluged it enough to be moderately reliable, but for those of us who carried "Stoner's wonder weapon"... It remains a piece of C**p.
Stoner was a firearms genius. Where would we be today without him?
 

TX_Kinz

Alpha
I was an armorer amongst other skills in the Army during the 80’s and early 90’s. The way I dealt with jams as a range NCO was to place the weapon as close to a 45-degree angle (after dropping the mag of course) while pointing down range. I would then kick down with my heal on the charging handle to clear the jam. It worked every time I was faced with the issue.
 

C. Sumpin

Custom
I was an armorer amongst other skills in the Army during the 80’s and early 90’s. The way I dealt with jams as a range NCO was to place the weapon as close to a 45-degree angle (after dropping the mag of course) while pointing down range. I would then kick down with my heal on the charging handle to clear the jam. It worked every time I was faced with the issue.
How often were you faced with that issue and why?
You may have had a higher level of expertise in your other skills.
But, guess that is a testimony that the AR can withstand abuse.
 

TX_Kinz

Alpha
It would happen at least once when we would be at the range. You never know if their squad leaders inspected their guys weapons before returning to the arms room. Usually the weapons were bone dry when I’d inspect them afterwards.

The M16A2 was very rugged and didn’t seem to have the issues the OG had. I did use the original for my first year or so and never had any issues other than the occasional cracked handguard.

Like a lot of soldiers, I had the opportunity to attend several schools to supplement my MOS.
 

TSiWRX

Custom
I've only ever had to resort to mortaring and "kick-starting" (as @TX_Kinz wrote of above) my ARs on purposefully-induced stoppages.

I tend to go heavy with good lube (my preferred - as many in my neck of the woods due to the "Disciples of Pat" :) - still continues to be Slip2000 EWL), so I've really not seen any spontaneous issues even though I'm really quite embarrassingly very lackadaisical about actually cleaning my training/range beaters 😅 . [ Of-course having an in-spec gun with good components - along with running reasonably decent ammo - also helps.... ]

I gotta admit, this little gadget has my interest piqued.

Not enough yet to replace the proven charging handles in my training/defensive guns, but maybe I'll put one on my hobby-gun to play with......... Give it a couple of good pulls (as Mr. Carlson's demos certainly seems to suggest that the physics of it really does work that well!) to see how that goes, and maybe also give it a couple of kick-starts, just for good measure, too?

Interesting way to attack this type of stoppage, that's for-sure!
 

Bear007

Elite
... I'll ask: how many on this forum have no confidence in the AR?
I'd change that around and say who does have complete confidence in their AR?

I only joined TAL in July and during that time the 2 biggest things I've learned is -

1) that every AR typically likes certain ammo and fails constantly with other ammos. There is no complaining here you just have shoot a lot ammo to find out what that is for you and your rifle.

2) cleaning and lubrication are key components to an AR's reliable operation.

Follow these 2 things and you can make your AR as reliable as any weapon out there.

I clean and lube my rifles regularly. I have found ammo that shoots and cycles very well and ammo that has been a miserable failure in both my Ruger AR-556 and my SA Victor AR-10. Now that I know this I have complete confidence in both.
 

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
I'd change that around and say who does have complete confidence in their AR?

I only joined TAL in July and during that time the 2 biggest things I've learned is -

1) that every AR typically likes certain ammo and fails constantly with other ammos. There is no complaining here you just have shoot a lot ammo to find out what that is for you and your rifle.

2) cleaning and lubrication are key components to an AR's reliable operation.

Follow these 2 things and you can make your AR as reliable as any weapon out there.

I clean and lube my rifles regularly. I have found ammo that shoots and cycles very well and ammo that has been a miserable failure in both my Ruger AR-556 and my SA Victor AR-10. Now that I know this I have complete confidence in both.
Agree100% 👍
 
Top