testtest

Recoil Reduction System

Sigma4506

Operator
Founding Member
So on the John Stayer 50,000 round 1911 post in this forum, it mentioned him using a DPM Systems recoil reduction system.

it spiked my interest for some of my .45’s.

it can be used on all calibers, and they have one for just about every gun maker.

I ordered one and will give it a try for a good test.

anyone ever use one ?
or other recoil mitigation ?

i attached a pic for refer


Description from DPM

The DPM Recoil Reduction System is a direct replacement for the stock recoil rod and does not change the configuration of the gun. This system works due to the multi spring intricate rod (three springs) and controls the functionality of the gun. The third spring which is contained within the rod controls the movement of the slide so it never rams on the frame. Also accompanying this system are two separate springs so the owner can fine-tune the weapon for his/her personal standards.

The slide extended system is an innovation of DPM Systems Technologies and it is available only for the subcompact pistols.
A plug (bushing) is used in cooperation with the DPM Recoil Reducer System so as to create more space in the slide of subcompact pistols so these models can accommodate the DPM Mechanical recoil reduction system.


OVERALL ADVANTAGES

Love my DPM recoil ,I use it in my Glock 19&23 - I use 147 grain 9mm ammo and noticed a lot less recoil on fast shooting and noticeable less on normal / also in my p229 SIG - looking at the 4 inch Kimber DPM that I think I can use in my 1911 Springfield 9mm 4inch / people at the range that use DPM its 50/50 on recoil - Go EBay -
 
C

chrisjohnson65

Guest
Has anyone actually installed one in a XDs .45 (my EDC), or a XDM .45 (my bedroom pistol)? I'd like to hear from someone who has done this with the pistols I have mentioned, before I try it.
 

Bassbob

Ronin
I've just never felt the recoil of any of the guns I own was too much. Handgun-wise I have been a .45 ACP guy as long as I can remember so when people talk about recoil on 9mm it makes me scratch my head. I have never shot a .45 that I couldn't easily get back on target quickly or which was uncomfortable recoil wise. My .357s and .44 Mag don't kick hard enough to bother me. I did have a Super Blackhawk in .44 that wasn't particularly comfortable to shoot.
 
I posted a request about DPM on another board and this was one reply. Take as you may. How valid I do not know.

posted December 12, 2020 11:00 AMDecember 12, 2020 11:00 AMHide Post
DPM is a Greek company, with zero customer service. I don’t think their system does anything for recoil: multi- spring assemblies divide recoil between springs, but can’t change physics. Newton still rules the day.

The DPM system uses springs that look suspiciously like they came from a European hardware store. When corresponding with the owner (DPM appears to be one guy), he seemed surprised that I’d be interested in buying spare springs, or various weights of springs as spares. He seemed suspicious, too, like perhaps I might be trying to make my own reduced recoil system, or steal his secrets.

I bought a kit from a member here, who had no luck getting any information from DPM. I did get through to the owner, but he’s very tight with his information, and I can’t say given the source and the materials that I have much confidence in the system. I bought it for a P320 compact with the idea of having spring options to tune for a given bullet weight and load, but the DPM system really doesn’t do that. It does over several combinations of springs for something like six possible weights, but gives no indication as to what they might be. The springs, construction and material, do not look to me like they’d hold up for long. The owner seemed surprised that I’d replace the springs with any regularity: he seemed to feel that his product was a lifetime arrangement, the insinuation being that nobody would ever shoot a pistol enough to require new springs. I don’t have confidence that the DPM springs would last long.
 

HansGruber

Hellcat
While you can’t change physics—that is, a 230gr bullet moving at 850fps is going to have X amount of recoil—what you can do with these dual spring setups is change the recoil impulse from one quick kick into a slower push—flatten the curve, so to speak.
 

KillerFord1977

Hellcat
Founding Member
I posted a request about DPM on another board and this was one reply. Take as you may. How valid I do not know.

posted December 12, 2020 11:00 AMDecember 12, 2020 11:00 AMHide Post
DPM is a Greek company, with zero customer service. I don’t think their system does anything for recoil: multi- spring assemblies divide recoil between springs, but can’t change physics. Newton still rules the day.

The DPM system uses springs that look suspiciously like they came from a European hardware store. When corresponding with the owner (DPM appears to be one guy), he seemed surprised that I’d be interested in buying spare springs, or various weights of springs as spares. He seemed suspicious, too, like perhaps I might be trying to make my own reduced recoil system, or steal his secrets.

I bought a kit from a member here, who had no luck getting any information from DPM. I did get through to the owner, but he’s very tight with his information, and I can’t say given the source and the materials that I have much confidence in the system. I bought it for a P320 compact with the idea of having spring options to tune for a given bullet weight and load, but the DPM system really doesn’t do that. It does over several combinations of springs for something like six possible weights, but gives no indication as to what they might be. The springs, construction and material, do not look to me like they’d hold up for long. The owner seemed surprised that I’d replace the springs with any regularity: he seemed to feel that his product was a lifetime arrangement, the insinuation being that nobody would ever shoot a pistol enough to require new springs. I don’t have confidence that the DPM springs would last long.
I have the DPM in my .45 P220. Noticeable difference in recoil. Not huge, but enough to take away the snap. As for my normal .45 1911 from Springfield, I dont feel its necessary. As i do not feel its needed on any of my 9mm, but I dont run compact 9mm pistols. To each his own. I’d also like to say with all handguns, it depends on shooter.
what’s good for one is not good for all.
(Cue in Calif and NY govt rega🙃😉)
 

Talyn

Ronin
Founding Member
Similar set-ups have been around for a long time. I tried one a decade or so ago in a 1911 but had function issues so went back to the conventional set-up.

Manufacturers figure out what's right for proper functioning. But, you can play with different standard recoil spring weights to lessen the impulse, as per HGs comment, until you hit the functionality threshold.

But I have gone to chrome-silicon springs for greater life-span than conventional springs.
 
Last edited:
Top