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Review: Mitch Rosen 5JR Express Holster for the Emissary 1911

BobM

Ronin
Thanks for article Mike,
Mitch Rosen makes a good fitting and working leather holster. On the black? I like black, but brown seems to be better at not showing any possible debris or scuffs and looks more natural. Brown stays looking good longer from use and opinion. But, black coloring's a bit easier to produce in some ways though?
 

Mike H.

Editor, The Armory Life
Staff member
Thanks for article Mike,
Mitch Rosen makes a good fitting and working leather holster. On the black? I like black, but brown seems to be better at not showing any possible debris or scuffs and looks more natural. Brown stays looking good longer from use and opinion. But, black coloring's a bit easier to produce in some ways though?
BobM,

I reached out to the company on your behalf, and received the following response from Mitch himself:


Sir,

I’m not certain that I follow your comment/question. Is it a manufacturing question, or a fashion question? I’ll do my best to briefly address both.

Our leathers are vat dyed, literally soaked in dye for a certain amount of time to get the color completely through. The advantage of this process is if the surface is scratched or abraded, the leather underneath is still the same color. Many people use leather that has the dye sprayed on: it’s a cheaper process. This will show every scratch and rub made. Perhaps that is what you’re noticing. I’ve been in manufacturing since 1966 and in the holster business for thirty years. I’ve never noticed that black (or any other color) was easier to work.

Regarding color, the best color to choose is the one that matches the type of clothing folks are used to seeing you wear. If you like browns and tans, brown belt with brown rig. Blacks, blues and grays… well, you get the idea.

Hope this was helpful,

Mitch
 

BobM

Ronin
BobM,

I reached out to the company on your behalf, and received the following response from Mitch himself:


Sir,

I’m not certain that I follow your comment/question. Is it a manufacturing question, or a fashion question? I’ll do my best to briefly address both.

Our leathers are vat dyed, literally soaked in dye for a certain amount of time to get the color completely through. The advantage of this process is if the surface is scratched or abraded, the leather underneath is still the same color. Many people use leather that has the dye sprayed on: it’s a cheaper process. This will show every scratch and rub made. Perhaps that is what you’re noticing. I’ve been in manufacturing since 1966 and in the holster business for thirty years. I’ve never noticed that black (or any other color) was easier to work.

Regarding color, the best color to choose is the one that matches the type of clothing folks are used to seeing you wear. If you like browns and tans, brown belt with brown rig. Blacks, blues and grays… well, you get the idea.

Hope this was helpful,

Mitch

Thanks for the contact both ways Mike,
"Is it a manufacturing question, or a fashion question?" - A bit of both? Agreed, vat dyed leather is best for saturation reasons stated and is usually considered better than spray finishes. Dye, batch or vat color lots can vary though. Part of reasoning is also color matching for repairs or when adding accessories if needed, it's generally easier to match up with black than most any other color and is part of what intended and meant with statement. Scuffing can usually be buffed out easier and better with vat died.

Another part of what meant by original statement pertaining to color and debris, debris can also mean dirt and dust to many people. Lighter brown (Tan or natural) and some other natural colors, debris usually shows less than what it does on black does is all. Naturals and some lighter browns, tans can act as a sort of a camouflage to look better longer and can usually be matched up easier if needed. Reddish colors generally rank up there with black and some other darker colors in looking dingier sooner too. Dye color and appearance can also vary with type of leather or other materials and with smooth verses rough finish leather. Is only personal experience is all. I am not a commercial holster manufacturer for others. Is just an enjoyable hobby.
 
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