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SAINT Victor vs. Steel-Cased Ammo: What Broke?

Recusant

Professional
Because steel cased ammo is cheaper than brass newbies buy boxes of it to shoot in their expensive guns. After shooting the cheapest ammo they can find, they then accuse their new gun of being inaccurate. Like Anni, I also stay away from steel cased ammo except I do shoot it through my AKs. But then most AKs were built to cycle about everything you run through it. I have found that there are some guns with very tight chamber tolerances, like Lugers, that will not eject fired steel cases and this may cause the extractor to break. If there is any hint that your gun doesn't like steel cased ammo then switch to something else pronto.
 

BobT

Elite
Nice video however please consider that playing music under your voice track makes it hard for us with service related tinnitus to hear your words clearly. Please consider limiting the music or other added sounds to the beginning and end of your videos. Thank you.
 

iklwa

Master Class
Steel cased ammo has been and will continue to be used as a cost reduction method of production. The AK system was designed from the outset (as were other platforms with fluted chambers) to use steel cased ammo.

The AR, being an American animal, was designed around brass cased ammo.
It has been widely known that much steel cased ammo was also primed with corrosive primers and after firing, the firearm should be immediately cleaned regardless of design.

In a smooth chambered firearm, when the steel shell expands during firing, it does not contract back to its original dimensions as much as brass (the material is not as plastic) and tends to take more extraction force due to additional contact area with the chamber walls. That's when extractors not designed for those forces fail.

If you're gonna feed bones into a meat grinder, ya had better have a strong grinder.
 

Pitdogg2

Professional
I've shot thousands of steel case ammo through my H-bar AR. Not one problem. The other thing besides elasticity in the brass cases is steel has in most cases a polymer coating on the case to keep from rusting. This polymer can also inhibit the case extraction (builds up). If you plan on shooting steel be sure to also scrub the chamber along with the barrel after each shooting session.

Steel for me is easier to police up at the farm after shooting. One heavy duty magnet bar and it is all picked for the most part. Try that with brass.

When I do shoot brass cased I drag out a old tarp to spread out so the brass is easier to pick up.
 

Old_Me

Hellcat
i have shot several hundreds of rounds of steel case, i my 9MM's as that's what was available cheaper than brass, during the panic buying craze.

as a matter of habit, i clean and lube all my guns, after every range trip, so it was not a problem.

it shoots well, can be a bit dirty, and i have found them to be as accurate as possible.

but when the prices started to rise as fast if not faster than brass ammo, i stopped buying it.

otherwise, i'd have a well stocked cabinet of steel case ammo.
 

Cyco

Alpha
I currently have 2 Victor Saints, 7.5" barrels. One will not shoot steel, gets jambed EVERY time. The other seams to handle it. Although, seams if you shoot "slow" it's more likley to jamb. I have Saint Edge rifle that also jambs with steel casing ammo. I do not buy steel casing any longer, I don't care how cheap it is.......
 
Steel cased ammo has been and will continue to be used as a cost reduction method of production. The AK system was designed from the outset (as were other platforms with fluted chambers) to use steel cased ammo.

The AR, being an American animal, was designed around brass cased ammo.
It has been widely known that much steel cased ammo was also primed with corrosive primers and after firing, the firearm should be immediately cleaned regardless of design.

In a smooth chambered firearm, when the steel shell expands during firing, it does not contract back to its original dimensions as much as brass (the material is not as plastic) and tends to take more extraction force due to additional contact area with the chamber walls. That's when extractors not designed for those forces fail.

If you're gonna feed bones into a meat grinder, ya had better have a strong grinder.
Unless you are running old surplus ammo in old comblock calibers (7.62x54 specifically, and some 7.62x39), there hasn’t been corrosive NEW PRODUCTION steel cased ammo imported since the 1990’s.

About the only corrosive 5.56 I’ve ever heard of was Norinco, which had been banned since Clinton was president, and very rare nowadays.

In short, unless you’re dealing with the earlier mentioned calibers...the steel ain’t corrosive.
 

iklwa

Master Class
Unless you are running old surplus ammo in old comblock calibers (7.62x54 specifically, and some 7.62x39), there hasn’t been corrosive NEW PRODUCTION steel cased ammo imported since the 1990’s.

About the only corrosive 5.56 I’ve ever heard of was Norinco, which had been banned since Clinton was president, and very rare nowadays.

In short, unless you’re dealing with the earlier mentioned calibers...the steel ain’t corrosive.
You never know what will show up.
You are right about corrosive Soviet block production coming from decades past.
It wouldn't surprise me in the least to find some Chinese production dug out of a hole somewhere, repackaged and sold as current production.
Some folks aren't as knowledgeable as you so I thought I would just make the statement.
Its surprising what gets sold during an ammunition shortage.
I don't use steel cased ammunition in anything.
Period...
 
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