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Is Everything You Know About .40 Wrong?

SaltyMonkey252

Master Class
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youngolddude

Master Class
I have no experience with a .40, but I do with 9 mm and .45 in the S&W Shield. I find those soft shooting. Would I find the .40 soft shooting in a Shield instead of the article's much larger gun? Isn't the pressure higher with low to mid 30,000 psi? Isn't that more damaging to a gun? Just wondering.
 

Flyboy514

Operator
As Dan mentioned, I got an XD-9 back when the ammo was plentiful & cheaper than the .40
I was ready to "pull the trigger" (pun intended) and buy an XD-40, but opted for the 9mm b/c of the ammo situation.
Also... I'd sure like to get ammo at the price Dan mentioned in the video! I haven't seen those kinda prices in quite awhile.
 

ocean23

Alpha
I have no experience with a .40, but I do with 9 mm and .45 in the S&W Shield. I find those soft shooting. Would I find the .40 soft shooting in a Shield instead of the article's much larger gun? Isn't the pressure higher with low to mid 30,000 psi? Isn't that more damaging to a gun? Just wondering.
I have a .40 Shield with almost 7k rounds through it and use it for my EDC. If you are an experienced shooter you can handle the 40. I also have a 9m and Sig barrel that gives me access to ammo I can find. Living in the Chicago area I prefer the 40. The caliber and my shot placement gives me piece of mind (retired LEO).
 
Hello all, here is today's article posted on TheArmoryLife.com. It is titled "Is Everything You Know About .40 Wrong?" and can be found at https://www.thearmorylife.com/is-everything-you-know-about-40-wrong/.

Interesting article but some points I'd like to point out. First, .45 defensive loads are NOT typically 230 grains. Second is that bigger bullets do not always translate to "snappy" recoil. I kind of feel that most .45 rounds will PUSH rather than snap. The .45 round is not, I think harder to deal with than the .40 which is a decidedly smack rather than a push. As for 9mm the only real thing I think it has going for it is less, to none, recoil, less weight to carry all day, and more rounds which you shouldn't need anyway. Course I'm a dinosaur because I carry a 9MM in a 1911 Officer model. But only because of weight. At 79 every ounce counts. And of course, because I'm a dinosaur and perhaps soon to become extinct.
 
Right caliber but Short & Weak compared to the more capable relative.
Them: "It's short and weak!" Me: "Not according to the numbers." Them: "Wellllll, it's too snappy!" Me: "Well which is it?" And also, because 10mm is more powerful the 40 is thus weak?! (Sigh.) By that logic a 7mm Mag is "weak" because a 458 Lott is more powerful. SMDH.
 
I have used the .40 SW, chambered in an XD Compact, for some years now as either my primary or a backup to one of my 10mm, now the XDm 5.25 10mm. As the .40 is to the 10mm, in essence what .380 is to the 9mm, it has always been a nearly perfect combination for me. I am and have been an ardent end user of the Springfield XD an XDm family of firearms. now that they have stopped production, sadly, of the XDm 5.25 in 10mm, which is and has been my primary carry since its release, I'm looking forward to what they are going to replace it with. Maybe there will be news at the Shot Show this year.

I'm not sure exactly what the trend is to return to the 9mm. I suspect it's a combination of LE's return to it, Industry hype, actual availability, and to some degree the fact that it's a "gentler" caliber to shoot and handle for those who seem to have a more sensitive nature and .... it's somewhat higher capacity.
for those of the firearms community who were brought up in a somewhat different mindset, the auto loader calibers of choice for primary carry will always likely start with at least a '4' or be a '10'.
However. given the new bullet designs, powders, and primers that exist today is in great part "why" the 9mm continues to be a popular and iconic cartridge and is found in nearly every manufacture's product line up.
I still have and, on occasion, use one of my Browning Hi Power's and am on the waiting list for the new Springfield SA
 
Interesting article but some points I'd like to point out. First, .45 defensive loads are NOT typically 230 grains. Second is that bigger bullets do not always translate to "snappy" recoil. I kind of feel that most .45 rounds will PUSH rather than snap. The .45 round is not, I think harder to deal with than the .40 which is a decidedly smack rather than a push. As for 9mm the only real thing I think it has going for it is less, to none, recoil, less weight to carry all day, and more rounds which you shouldn't need anyway. Course I'm a dinosaur because I carry a 9MM in a 1911 Officer model. But only because of weight. At 79 every ounce counts. And of course, because I'm a dinosaur and perhaps soon to become extinct.
To be realistic though, any round will do in self-defense. Otherwise, an S & W 500 would be used causing criminal risk as it goes through the threat, the car, the school behind the car, and so on. I love the .40 cal round. Works fine. The point is to stop the action. This round does just fine doing the job as .380, 9MM, and others. You are likely not going to use more than 1 or 2 rounds in the .001% that you may need to defend yourself. Springfields are great weapons. Unfortunately, they make these in Croatia, so I prefer Glocks. It is a great design, but I have seen many a Springfield lock up from overseas mfg. Glocks never. ever. ever. fail. Nor do wheel guns. I have the latest Walther version of their .40 cal. Like that the most. In summer, a glock 27 gen 5 is easier to carry in a pocket holster. Just my opinion after 30 years of shooting and hunting.
 
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