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reloading questions/advice if you would please?

The "Lee" base blocks are pre-drilled to universally fit all "Lee" brand presses, but can be drilled to fit any press. The only requirement is that to use them you'll need some 'elevator' bolts (flat heads with a square shoulder) sort of like a 'carriage' bolt to bolt the press down. And you only need the 'base' block, not both pieces.

Another option is to cut your own 'base' block out of 1/2" plywood in the same pattern as the "Lee" base block. That way you can use most any bolt by simply counter boring the bottom side of the hole to hide the bolt head and retain a smooth base. You will also need to drill one 'locator' hole if you decide to use the plywood. I think you'll find a drawing in the box your bench block and base block set came in that describes how to cut the plywood. If not there, it can be 'Googled' I'm sure.

(y) (y)(y)
Question about the"elevator" bolt being a flat head? Unlike the carriage head being semi-spherical/half some shape (what I'm familiar with) is the "elevator" bolt really flat headed? If so I wouldn't mind finding some of those!
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
Question about the"elevator" bolt being a flat head? Unlike the carriage head being semi-spherical/half some shape (what I'm familiar with) is the "elevator" bolt really flat headed? If so I wouldn't mind finding some of those!
Yes, they have a very flat head. When I referred to the carriage bolt, I was referring to the little square shoulder under the head. The 'elevator' head will be round or sort of an oval shape about 1/2" x 3/8" and about < 1/16" thick on a 1/4" dia bolt.

They're usually found in the 'specialty' fastener section of regular home builder supply stores like Lowes and Home Depot. I've found them at both places here in town. But you can usually ask for them at Ace or other good hardware store and a good sales rep will know about them. (y)(y)(y)


What is an elevator bolt?



Image result for elevator bolts
Originally designed for attaching elevator buckets to conveyor belts, elevator bolts are similar to carriage bolts, except the head is thin and flat. Elevator Bolts have a square neck that resists turning when the nut is tightened or removed. The large head provides a greater bearing surface for soft materials.
 
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Yes, they have a very flat head. When I referred to the carriage bolt, I was referring to the little square shoulder under the head. The 'elevator' head will be round or sort of an oval shape about 1/2" x 3/8" and about < 1/16" thick on a 1/4" dia bolt.

They're usually found in the 'specialty' fastener section of regular home builder supply stores like Lowes and Home Depot. I've found them at both places here in town. But you can usually ask for them at Ace or other good hardware store and a good sales rep will know about them. (y)(y)(y)


What is an elevator bolt?



Image result for elevator bolts
Originally designed for attaching elevator buckets to conveyor belts, elevator bolts are similar to carriage bolts, except the head is thin and flat. Elevator Bolts have a square neck that resists turning when the nut is tightened or removed. The large head provides a greater bearing surface for soft materials.
I'm very familiar with the carriage head, I've used many. Those would work great where I need them! Mounted a vise with carriage head.
20220313_215714.jpg
 

Old_Me

Hellcat
ok, picked up my "new to me", Dillon 550c this morning.

and yup, it's as complete as can be, except for the dies.

still ain't decided on how to mount it yet. Dillon wants nearly $100 for thier bench mount, and i haven't found any "universal" mounts just yet.

as you see it in this picture, the left rear mounting hole, goes right over thick boards i used to "beef up" the bench.

the front most mounting hole on that left side, just goes over the plywood bench top, but i can beef that up as well
same as the right side 2 mounting holes.

so far, in the short time i have had with this press,

i got way too many things to do today, so setting up this press will be done in stages as well as the Lee was

1647269255698.png
 
I have a tool head for each caliber with dies in place on my 650 to make change overs simpler. They are stored on the shelf behind the kegs of powder on Dillon tool head stands. One of the stored tool heads also has a powder measure attached. I use 1 powder measure for .32, 9mm and 38. and one for Schofield and .45 Colt. The adjustments between calibers isn't much compared with using 1 measure for all. My 650 is permanently mounted to my bench, while the MEC, 2- Dillons and Lyman are mounted to a piece of plywood and attach where you see the MEC mounted on the bench with 1 bolt threaded into a t nut. Excuse the mess, I tend to let it get out of hand before cleaning it all up.
Check MidwayUSA for Lee carbide dies. They are often on sale, get the 4 die set.
 

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Old_Me

Hellcat
I have a tool head for each caliber with dies in place on my 650 to make change overs simpler. They are stored on the shelf behind the kegs of powder on Dillon tool head stands. One of the stored tool heads also has a powder measure attached. I use 1 powder measure for .32, 9mm and 38. and one for Schofield and .45 Colt. The adjustments between calibers isn't much compared with using 1 measure for all. My 650 is permanently mounted to my bench, while the MEC, 2- Dillons and Lyman are mounted to a piece of plywood and attach where you see the MEC mounted on the bench with 1 bolt threaded into a t nut. Excuse the mess, I tend to let it get out of hand before cleaning it all up.
Check MidwayUSA for Lee carbide dies. They are often on sale, get the 4 die set.
yeah thanks.

i just came back from Lowes, i had to buy some thinner bolts, wing nuts, and i also bought some lag screws.

i'm gonna mount the Dillon to the bench permanently at one corner, the Lee at the other, as in the previous pics.
 

michael.ed

Master Class
Founding Member
ok, picked up my "new to me", Dillon 550c this morning.

and yup, it's as complete as can be, except for the dies.

still ain't decided on how to mount it yet. Dillon wants nearly $100 for thier bench mount, and i haven't found any "universal" mounts just yet.

as you see it in this picture, the left rear mounting hole, goes right over thick boards i used to "beef up" the bench.

the front most mounting hole on that left side, just goes over the plywood bench top, but i can beef that up as well
same as the right side 2 mounting holes.

so far, in the short time i have had with this press,

i got way too many things to do today, so setting up this press will be done in stages as well as the Lee was

View attachment 25630

I got my mount from Inline Fabrication. It sits a little higher than the Dillon. Very well made and it costs 75.00 with free shipping.
Here is the link.
 
I have a tool head for each caliber with dies in place on my 650 to make change overs simpler. They are stored on the shelf behind the kegs of powder on Dillon tool head stands. One of the stored tool heads also has a powder measure attached. I use 1 powder measure for .32, 9mm and 38. and one for Schofield and .45 Colt. The adjustments between calibers isn't much compared with using 1 measure for all. My 650 is permanently mounted to my bench, while the MEC, 2- Dillons and Lyman are mounted to a piece of plywood and attach where you see the MEC mounted on the bench with 1 bolt threaded into a t nut. Excuse the mess, I tend to let it get out of hand before cleaning it all up.
Check MidwayUSA for Lee carbide dies. They are often on sale, get the 4 die set.
I was tired of the cost of the toolhead stands, so I improvised. Made 21 of these for less than 5 bucks each. I saved 420 bucks and used it towards a 2nd 550. 1 setup for small primers and 1 for large primers. The crimp die is 1 1/8 so it won't fit the Dillon. My pistol stands are blue.
20220314_213445.jpg
 
ok, picked up my "new to me", Dillon 550c this morning.

and yup, it's as complete as can be, except for the dies.

still ain't decided on how to mount it yet. Dillon wants nearly $100 for thier bench mount, and i haven't found any "universal" mounts just yet.

as you see it in this picture, the left rear mounting hole, goes right over thick boards i used to "beef up" the bench.

the front most mounting hole on that left side, just goes over the plywood bench top, but i can beef that up as well
same as the right side 2 mounting holes.

so far, in the short time i have had with this press,

i got way too many things to do today, so setting up this press will be done in stages as well as the Lee was

View attachment 25630
Careful setting up the powder funnel, I've crushed some cases before. After you get the case length where you want put the case where the powder stage is. Run the die with the measurer attached (loose enough so it can turn). Make sure the return rod is attached also. Screw the die down until it dispenses the powder (not with powder of course). You want it to return before braking the seal so the powder doesn't fall out.
 
Hopefully I'll get these in order.
 

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I was tired of the cost of the toolhead stands, so I improvised. Made 21 of these for less than 5 bucks each. I saved 420 bucks and used it towards a 2nd 550. 1 setup for small primers and 1 for large primers. The crimp die is 1 1/8 so it won't fit the Dillon. My pistol stands are blue.View attachment 25643
Edit: 1 1/4', not 1 1/8" using Lee Classic Cast Single Stage. You know it's cast, because that sucker is heavy!
 

Old_Me

Hellcat
I have a tool head for each caliber with dies in place on my 650 to make change overs simpler. They are stored on the shelf behind the kegs of powder on Dillon tool head stands. One of the stored tool heads also has a powder measure attached. I use 1 powder measure for .32, 9mm and 38. and one for Schofield and .45 Colt. The adjustments between calibers isn't much compared with using 1 measure for all. My 650 is permanently mounted to my bench, while the MEC, 2- Dillons and Lyman are mounted to a piece of plywood and attach where you see the MEC mounted on the bench with 1 bolt threaded into a t nut. Excuse the mess, I tend to let it get out of hand before cleaning it all up.
Check MidwayUSA for Lee carbide dies. They are often on sale, get the 4 die set.
well, that certainly IS a reloading area.

i envy you guys that have a huge area/room to do this.

i bolted down the Dillon with 2 lag screws, at the rear of the press, and they go into the leg support wood i had doubled up on.

then i put 2 "L" brackets into the wall and table for added support
 

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Old_Me

Hellcat
I got my mount from Inline Fabrication. It sits a little higher than the Dillon. Very well made and it costs 75.00 with free shipping.
Here is the link.
yes, i see that all the time on the Gavintoob videos.
 

jumpinjoe

Professional
well, that certainly IS a reloading area.

i envy you guys that have a huge area/room to do this.

i bolted down the Dillon with 2 lag screws, at the rear of the press, and they go into the leg support wood i had doubled up on.

then i put 2 "L" brackets into the wall and table for added support
Just a tip, but you might want to 'through' drill those bolt holes at the front of the press and add a couple machine bolts/nuts. The way it's bolted now if you were to get a 'stuck' case and pulled up on the press handle too hard, it could easily break out one or both holes on the rear edge of the press base.

I'm pretty sure the "Dillons" are made of cast iron, unlike mild steel, and it is breakable under just the right stresses. It may never in your life time break on you, but if it does, your press is most likely done. Cast can be welded, but it'll never look the same and very well may not ever really be the same again.

Just a little 'food for thought'. You got a great deal ...... it'd be a shame to break it for something so simple to fix.
 
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